To borrow from

Habituellement

Senior Member
Hello.

Walter Scott's great subject is modernization. Borrowing from eighteenth-century conjectural history, he used large-scale fictional narratives to argue that certain stages of civilization must in due course give way to others. This process is slow by nature but can, conveniently for the novelist, be represented as a sudden, traumatic event.
I am searching for synonymous for "to borrow from" in the above sentence - even synonymous which are not very strict.
Maybe
ㅡ similarly to eighteenth-century conjectural history?
ㅡ relying on eighteenth-century conjectural history?
ㅡ appealing to eighteenth-century conjectural history?

I am open to every suggestion (I am not a native English speaker).

Many thanks for your help.
 
  • Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    Borrow is often followed by XXX+from. See this forum definition of borrow (I've underlined "from"):
    2. to use, appropriate, or introduce from another source or from a foreign source: to borrow an idea from the opposition; to borrow a word from French.

    So he's following the style used in eighteenth-century conjectural history.
     

    Dretagoto

    Senior Member
    Inglés británico
    So he's following the style used in eighteenth-century conjectural history.
    :thumbsup:

    You could perhaps also use something like "Typical of the style of eighteenth-century conjectural history..." or "In the manner of..."

    (Just to help you to be as correct as possible, Habituellement - the word you mean is "synonym". "Synonymous" is the adjective form, but we understood you, so don't worry.)
     
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