to branch off

marsplastic

Senior Member
Korean
Our seller started a sentence with "To branch off from my first email"
First email was about inspection for product finished and second email was about he attached the inspection report.
Does this mean I attached the file regarding the first email and I want to know "to branch off from" is widely used.
 
  • I wouldn't say it was widely used since I've never seen it used in this way before.
    "Further to my previous email,..." - though perhaps sounding quite formal - would be more frequently used.
    A search gave me no hits for "To branch off from my previous email".
     

    marsplastic

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I wouldn't say it was widely used since I've never seen it used in this way before.
    "Further to my previous email,..." - though perhaps sounding quite formal - would be more frequently used.
    A search gave me no hits for "To branch off from my previous email".
    Ah ha. "Further to my previous email" is good to know.
    By the way, For your information from my previous email, how about this?
    Are they compatible?
     
    No. "For your information from my previous email" does not sound natural.
    Another possibility is "Following on from my previous email, ...". If you do a search on that, you will find examples.
    Perhaps that sounds a little less formal than "Further to my previous email, ...".
     
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