to break up with someone

Ume

Banned
Japanese
Hello.

1) to break up with someone (He broke up with his girlfriend last week.)
2) to split with someone (He split with his girlfriend last week.)
3) to split from someone (He split from his girlfriend last week.)

These all mean the same, don't they?
Is the first the most common?
 
  • katie_here

    Senior Member
    England/English
    BE.

    He finished with someone. That's more commonly said.

    Break up and split up yes, but mostly we use "finish".

    Colloquial - "Blown out".
     

    Ume

    Banned
    Japanese
    bibliolept and katie_here,
    Thanks a lot.

    - Tom and Mary broke up.
    - Tom and Mary got blown out.
    I wonder if the second (to get blown out) is as common as the first (to break up).
     
    Last edited:

    Moglet

    Senior Member
    UK
    British/Hiberno-English
    Another BE colloquialism is 'dumped', e.g:

    "Tom dumped Mary." (i.e. Tom was the instigator of the break-up of the relationship)
     

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    To get dumped has to be the worst end to a relationship. There is a connotation that the dumpee has been carried out to the refuse dump and kicked out of the back end of a pickup truck
     
    Last edited:

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hello.

    1) to break up with someone (He broke up with his girlfriend last week.)
    2) to split with someone (He split with his girlfriend last week.)
    3) to split from someone (He split from his girlfriend last week.)

    These all mean the same, don't they?
    Is the first the most common?
    "Break up" and "split up" would be most commonly used in Canada. To be honest, I never hear "split from". I don't think it's grammatically correct, is it? Something does not "split from" something else... it is simply "split" or "split up".
     

    katie_here

    Senior Member
    England/English
    Katie_here, could I persuade you to use "finish" and "blown out" in sample sentences or dialog?

    Yes, sure! :) As long as it's not you blowing me out or finishing with me!. :D

    "I was crying my eyes out last night"
    "Oh why is that?"
    "My boyfriend has blown me out, he doesn't want to see me anymore".

    (This is synonymous with finish like you would when you are finished with a candle and you blow it out.)

    "Oh I'm sick of that man!"
    "Why is that?"
    "He doesn't take me seriously and never has time for me".
    "What are you going to do about it?"
    "I'm going to finish with him".

    To finish (or end) the relationship.
     

    katie_here

    Senior Member
    England/English
    bibliolept and katie_here,
    Thanks a lot.

    - Tom and Mary broke up.
    - Tom and Mary got blown out.
    I wonder if the second (to get blown out) is as common as the first (to break up).

    It isn't Tom and Mary got blown out, unless it was someone else (a third party doing the blowing)

    If it concerns their relationship it's....

    (If Tom ends it)

    Tom has blown Mary out
    Mary was blown out by Tom.
     

    Ume

    Banned
    Japanese
    Thank you for all the comments, all.

    "blow someone out"
    Is this common not only in British English but also in AE?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'm far too old to know how common it is in BrE (I'd never heard it:().

    The Urban Dictionary has a BrE definition of "blow out" with a slightly different meaning: let down. It doesn't get many votes though, either in favour or against.
     

    Broccolicious

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "Break up" is very idiomatic in AE. So it "split up."

    I believe that "split with" is more common in BE, so perhaps they can address that phrase.
    Hi - I've never heard 'split with' - not sure it's common BE usage.

    And I have to say that I've never heard 'blow out' in the context of breaking up with someone, either. I've only heard it to mean 'stand up', or 'let down', as Loob suggests.

    eg "I waited an hour for you, but you didn't come. I can't believe you blew me out!" (The implication being that the relationship is still intact) (Although frankly, you shouldn't have waited an hour for him in the first place, my dear, and now you should dump him)

    B
     

    manska86

    Senior Member
    UK English
    "Break up" is very idiomatic in AE. So it "split up."

    I believe that "split with" is more common in BE, so perhaps they can address that phrase.
    I don't think you say split with to talk about a relationship ending. Someone can split with something, meaning they took something and ran away. I suppose you can do this with a person but it does not mean breaking up with them. You need the up to have this meaning.
     

    katie_here

    Senior Member
    England/English
    I'm far too old to know how common it is in BrE (I'd never heard it:().

    The Urban Dictionary has a BrE definition of "blow out" with a slightly different meaning: let down. It doesn't get many votes though, either in favour or against.
    Trying not to stray off topic, but "blown out" is also used when someone has successfully challenged someones opinion.

    For example, When one person says something is true, and another says it's untrue, then a third party comes in and supports one side.

    1st person... "I swear Ronaldo is leaving Manchester United".
    2nd person.. "No he isn't, he has no intentions of leaving".
    1st person. "I know I'm right, I heard it from my friend last night, and he knows someone who works at Old Trafford".
    2nd person. "You're wrong, he isn't leaving".
    3rd person "Look at this newspaper article, it says there has been rumours about Ronaldo leaving, but the Manager says he is here to stay".
    2nd person.. (to the 1st person) "ahh! you've been blown out. I told you it wasn't true".
     

    starnightnt

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    Hi everyone, may I ask more question ?

    "dump someone for someone else" : Does that mean to break up with someone due to someone else
    For example : He dumped me for Anna. It means he broke up with me because he fell in love with Anna, doesn't it ?
     
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