To bridge/save a difference of level

lzarzalejo73

Senior Member
Spanish
I'm not confident I'm using well the verb "to bridge" in the following sentence. This is a guide e-booklet about Granada.

Quote:

"...This is the starting point from where the path leads us to towards the west, alongside a pine wood ending in the remains of the Alberca Rota (the Broken Reservoir). This reservoir gathered up all the water coming from the Ramal del Tercio (branch) of the Acequia Real (Royal Canal). This was done by means of a complex waterwheel that had to bridge/save the 60 metre difference of level".

Thanks in advance for your kind cooperation.
 
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  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Do you mean that the waterwheel had to raise the water 60m from the canal to the reservoir? If so, it doesn't sound like a waterwheel to me. A waterwheel (often two words, water wheel) is a mechanism for turning a drop in water level into rotational energy. This must be some other type of mechanism.
     

    lzarzalejo73

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Quoting from Dictionary.com:
    "noun
    1.
    a wheel or turbine turned by the weight or momentum of water andused to operate machinery.
    2.
    a wheel with buckets for raising or drawing water, as a noria.
    3.
    the paddle wheel of a steamboat."
    I'm talking about the second use of the word. Thanks.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Quoting from Dictionary.com: ...
    Dictionaries try to arrange definitions in descending order of frequency of use. They do not indicate how much usage frequency drops off from one definition to the next. In modern usage, the first is by far the most common; the second is rare; and the third is largely of historical interest. If you want speakers of 2016 English to grasp your meaning on the first reading, don't use "water wheel" here.

    That said, can you describe this mechanism? And is your meaning what I asked if it is?
     

    lzarzalejo73

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I understand that not all twenty-first century readers, English or not, are prepared to recognise some words, particularly city dwellers. And the problem is not only a matter of the unfolding of time, but also cultures. These water wheels were used (and still are, to a lesser extent) in hot countries, with a relative shortage of water. Even though, I would be surprised if they are/were not known in the south of US, maybe in England too. I'm afraid we have all forgotten anything beyond technological gadgets! Rather than trying to explain you what these water wheels are (a "simple" large wheel with "buckets" attached round it, capable of "raising" the water from a lower level to a higher one. I'm enclosing herewith some pictures, from more primitive, basic devices (nothing to do with the one I was talking about), to more "sophisticated" ones. I hope I've been of help.
     

    lzarzalejo73

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    In the following link you can find more and better info about some medieval Islamic compartmented water wheels, going to the text about the"Islamic world". Water wheel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. The following picture may be of help, too. We can see clearly how the water was lifted from a lower to a higher level, often from a river to an irrigation canal.
     
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