to burn one's bridges

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  • shafaq

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    In Arabic it may expressed as "burning the ships" حَرْق السُفُن (harq-al-sufun)which backgrounded by Tariq bin Ziyad's story.
    طارق ابن زياد وقصة حرق السفن
     

    Anatoli

    Senior Member
    Native: русский (Russian), home country: English
    Thank you!

    I see حرق can be Harqa, Harraqa and Haraqa (burn, set fire to, scald, etc.). Sakhr dictionary doesn't explain well, which one is transitive/intransitive and the usage.

    Could it also be Haraqa?
     

    shafaq

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    It is Harqu-s-sufun حَرْقُ السُّفُنِ in this instance which means "burning (to set on fire) the ships" in infinitive form.
    . َحَرَقَ السفن Haraqa s-sufune is in simple past tense (he burned the ships) and transitive because it has an object (sufun-ships).
     

    Anatoli

    Senior Member
    Native: русский (Russian), home country: English
    I see, Harq wasn't a verb but a maSdar (مصدر). The online dictionary suggested one of the readings - Harq - burn and I took it for a verb (simple past tense) but this is a noun. Sometimes the part of speech is not obvious in that dictionary. http://qamoos.sakhr.com/

    Thanks again for clarifying.
     

    nn.om

    Senior Member
    Hi Finland.

    I think this would the best choice if there were some other choices.

    اغترب اغتراباً كاملاً لدرجة أنه قطع كل علاقاته بشعبه وثقافته
    ..qata3(a) kull(a) 3alaaqaatih(i)..
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    There's also the almost literal: قطع الجسور whereas قطع is used as a noun (qaT3) and a verb (qata3) depending on the structure we want to make.
     
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