to buy in / supplier

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piotr1980

Senior Member
Polish
Hello,

I have a question about a verb and noun ''to buy in'' in the context of being supplied. How do you use this verb & noun. Is the below correct ?


- The copany X buys in ( supplies itself) in Poland.
- The company X is supplied by the Polish producer.
- This was the biggest buy-in for this copmany this year. ( meaning that the copmany bought at this specific time the biggest number of products (supplies)

Many thanks
Piotr
 
  • All look correct to me, but the compound verb(?) "buy-in" is only used in the third sentence. Sorry, Edit: I should have said "a buy-in" is a noun, not a verb.

    The company buys in Poland (Where do they buy? In Poland)
    The company is supplied by the Polish Producer (pretty much the same meaning)
    but:
    This was the biggest "buy-in"... (A "buy-in" is a distinct term, I think it is usually used when a company or individual buys shares of another company).

    Hope that helps!
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    To "buy in" can simply mean to "stock up" from outside. "Auntie had bought in supplies for lunch so that was that."

    The sense is usually incomparison to having, for example, grown or made your own supplies in house. "Bought-in" (usually hyphenated) supplies are sourced from an outside supplier.

     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    From Matching Moles's post, I take it that buy-in is used normally in BE. In AE one would say 'purchase' or 'source'. Buy-in might be understood, but it is not generally used.

    Here are the AE versions of the sentences:

    - The copany X buys in ( supplies itself) in Poland. The company buys in Poland. ...or... The company does its sourcing in Poland.
    - The company X is supplied by the Polish producer. :tick: (Question: Is it by the Polish producer, or by a Polish supplier/producer?
    - This was the biggest buy-in for this copmany this year. This was the biggest purchase for this company this year.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    [...]
    The company buys in Poland (Where do they buy? In Poland)
    [...]
    I have a question:
    You've omitted in here; is it because the verb to buy in has to be used with an object so if you don't have any you can't actually use buy in? Or, would the sentence do with two ins as well?


    Tom
     
    Oh, sorry, my mistake, I didn't notice the "in" after the parenthesis. I think Cuchu is correct that "buy-in" is very much BE, it sounds very strange to my AE English ears, as I would reserve the use of "buy-in" to when an investore buys shares of a company.

    For me, "to buy in Poland" is sufficient to express the idea that the company purchases items from a Polish company, the extra "in" seems superfluous.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Thank you. :)

    Therefore, theoretically it is possible to say The copany X buys in in Poland., right?

    Tom
     
    But if, as mole explained, "buy-in" is some kind of compound verbal expression that basically means "to purchase", then wouldn't it be correct?

    I agree that I would not naturally say it that way, but if indeed "to buy in" is the verb, then "To buy in in Poland" would be okay.

    Actually, if it were hyphenated, "buy-in", the whole thing would be much clearer, and it would not seem so redundant "Company buys-in in Poland". I see Mole also noted that bought-in would usually be hyphenated.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Well, according to my dictionary it is a phrasal verb, have a look:
    buy something ↔ in phrasal verb
    to buy something in large quantities
    Companies are buying in supplies of paper, in case the price goes up.
    Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, Fourth Edition
    © Pearson Education Limited 2003
    Edit: So basically what I want to say is that company XXX stocks up in Poland with the addition of large quantities since buys in Poland has, I believe, a very verbatim meaning.

    Tom
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    It might work in BE with the hyphen, but without the hyphen....???

    Let's await a BE speaker to sort it out.

    Another view: Cambridge Dict. of Phrasal Verbs
    buy in sth or buy sth in British & Australian

    to buy a lot of something [e.g. food, drink], usually for a special occasion
    They'd bought in all this wine for the party and scarcely anyone showed
    No hyphen.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    But if, as mole explained, "buy-in" is some kind of compound verbal expression that basically means "to purchase", then wouldn't it be correct?

    I agree that I would not naturally say it that way, but if indeed "to buy in" is the verb, then "To buy in in Poland" would be okay.

    Actually, if it were hyphenated, "buy-in", the whole thing would be much clearer, and it would not seem so redundant "Company buys-in in Poland". I see Mole also noted that bought-in would usually be hyphenated.
    I think you have it there. "Buy in in Poland" is correct but would be avoided, and in any case if you were in Poland why would you say it? If you were not in Poland you would use "from". The verb form is not hyphenated, but the adjective is, and is usually past e.g. "Bought-in goods".
     

    Terry Morti

    Senior Member
    UK
    My understanding of buy-in is in marketing terms, to get the consumer to "buy in to a brand proposition" or in marketing jargon "how do we deliver customer buy-in?"

    While I agree with Matching Mole's comment that to "buy in" can mean to "stock up" from outside, I also concur with purchasing/sourcing comments of our AE speakers above.

    So:

    Company X buys in Poland
    Company X uses a Polish supplier (better)
    This was the biggest buy-in for this company this year. (I suppose given what you mean by it but sounds a bit like jargon and so might need clarification)
     
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