To cheat from somebody in a test

clapec

Senior Member
Italian
'I cheated from him in the Placement Test.'

What does 'cheat from' mean?
Does it mean that the speaker has helped his classmate with the test?
 
  • GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I've not ever seen "cheated from," so much as "cheated off of."

    In the example sentence you gave, the subject (I) cheated (got answers) from another person (him) while taking the Placement test. In other words, the speaker did the cheating by looking at someone else's answers.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I may cheat (intransitively, by placing a mirror so that I can see the cards in your hand).

    I may cheat on you (if you are my partner, by indulging in a liaison with someone else).

    I may cheat you (by not answering this question honestly).

    But in my experience, I cannot possibly cheat from, or cheat off, or cheat off of anyone. I don't know if this is AE/BE difference.
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    panjandrum said:
    I may cheat (intransitively, by placing a mirror so that I can see the cards in your hand).

    I may cheat on you (if you are my partner, by indulging in a liaison with someone else).

    I may cheat you (by not answering this question honestly).

    But in my experience, I cannot possibly cheat from, or cheat off, or cheat off of anyone. I don't know if this is AE/BE difference.

    People in Australia say "cheat off".
    "That's not your work. You were cheating off Sally. You've misspelled plagiarism, same as she did."
    "I didn't cheat off Sally. I copied this assignment off the net!"

    What would you say in NI or GB for someone who's looking over at her neighbour's exam paper and copying?
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Good question, and I'm beginning to think this might be a generational difference, not AE/BE/OzE.

    Naturally, back in the days when I did exams, there was no cheating:p

    In the circumstances Brioche describes, I would have been copying from Sally, not cheating off Sally.

    Don't take my view as typical BE. You need comment from someone rather closer to the current terminology of illegitimate exam procedure,
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    panjandrum said:
    Naturally, back in the days when I did exams, there was no cheating:p
    ...or else we had the good sense not to announce it, hence the lack of a good preposition to go with "I cheated...."
     

    mamboney

    Senior Member
    English (USA)
    riglos said:
    What about "to crib off /from somebody"?

    Mara.

    To "crib" = old-fashioned, something our parents would have done.
    As a matter of fact, they would have used a "crib sheet" to cheat.
    A crib sheet is a small piece of paper with answers to a test written on it that you would sneak into class with you.

    Crib is not used now - we just use "cheat".
     

    JLanguage

    Senior Member
    USA: American English, Learning Hebrew and Spanish
    mamboney said:
    As a matter of fact, they would have used a "crib sheet" to cheat.
    A crib sheet is a small piece of paper with answers to a test written on it that you would sneak into class with you.

    I would call that a "cheat sheet".
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    mamboney said:
    Crib is not used now - we just use "cheat".

    When I was in college (a "few" years ago) we were able to use professor-approved "crib sheets" in certain classes. We were limited to size of paper (single index card) and size of hand-writing.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    I wouldn't call "cheat off someone" a generational thing in AE-- to me it sounds solidly correct, with or without the "of."

    I think it's "off" instead of "from" because not only cheating but a sort of theft is implied. If Sally is in on the game, it's another matter, calling for a different expression even-- if I cheated off her test paper, it was without her knowledge, or at least her cooperation. I lifted it "off" her, so to speak-- ripped her off.

    "Cheat sheet" on the other hand does strike me as a younger expression. Even though crib sheets were infrequently allowed, the same term was used for memory aids that weren't.
    .
     
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