to chill the weekend out

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vost

Senior Member
France, Français
If I want to talk about nice place to chill out during the weekend, may I say a nice place to chill the weekend out ?
 
  • Nymeria

    Senior Member
    English - Barbadian/British/educated in US universities blend
    I would not say it unless I specifically wanted to use an unusual construction or I was making a play on the more common, "sleep the weekend away".

    I would just say, "a nice place to chill out during the weekend." ;)
     

    Nymeria

    Senior Member
    English - Barbadian/British/educated in US universities blend
    Yes, it means to sleep all weekend. (no "the")

    It means to spend all weekend or most of the weekend sleeping.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Grammatically you are changing an intransitive verb ("to chill out" doesn't take an object; you chill out yourself, you don't chill something else out) into a transitive one, and the object is "the weekend" rather than youself. This is perhaps illogical, strictly speaking, but nevertheless this sort of reversal does occur in casual and idiomatic speech, and in this case I think it works quite well. To me it's quite understandable and sounds natural. It's rather like using "chill out the weekend" in the same way we use "spend the weekend", but with an adverbial sense.

    I notice there are a few (although only a few) examples of this usage on the web, so it obviously seems natural to at least some other people as well.
     

    0216monty

    Member
    Chinese - Cantonese, Mandarin
    Grammatically you are changing an intransitive verb ("to chill out" doesn't take an object; you chill out yourself, you don't chill something else out) into a transitive one, and the object is "the weekend" rather than youself. This is perhaps illogical, strictly speaking, but nevertheless this sort of reversal does occur in casual and idiomatic speech, and in this case I think it works quite well. To me it's quite understandable and sounds natural. It's rather like using "chill out the weekend" in the same way we use "spend the weekend", but with an adverbial sense.

    I notice there are a few (although only a few) examples of this usage on the web, so it obviously seems natural to at least some other people as well.
    I found eight examples of "chill the weekend out"(with quotes) on google, four of which are from this thread, two seem to be from an indian website, and 1 from myspace.cn (China based) website :)
     
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