to come down to something

< Previous | Next >

halfpenny

Member
finnish
Hello! I wanted to ask you about this expression: to come down to something.
This is what I found from a dictionary: If a situation or decision comes down to something, that is the thing that influences it most:
What it all comes down to is your incredible insecurity.
It all comes down to money in the end.
I know it has other meanings as well but to be more specific I'd like to know if it's possible to use this expression for example instead of using because of.
Like this: We used to be happily married but now it's over and it's all because of you.
We used to be happily married but now it's over and it all comes down to you.
I know the tone is a bit different here but you'll probably get the picture.
Is it acceptable to use this expression this way?
 
  • Greyfriar

    Senior Member
    Hello,

    Not quite acceptable. If you wish to change the sentence it would need to be as follows -

    >We used to be happily married but now it's over and it's all down to you.'<

    This would be a more natural way than saying, 'it all comes down to you.'

    There are sure to be other opinions.
     

    halfpenny

    Member
    finnish
    Okay thank you for your answer! I'm still curious, what does this expression really mean? What does it mean if someone says It all comes down to you? I googled it and found this song called "all comes down". Can you tell me what does it mean in this song?

    I see in my soul that I know you were lying to me
    But why do I feel so old?
    'Cause I'm still so young
    It all comes down to you
     
    Last edited:

    Greyfriar

    Senior Member
    In this instance I would say, 'The blame lies with you.' However, in your original question about the end of a marriage, I can't imagine a wronged spouse saying 'it all comes down to you.' Certainly not in BE anyway.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top