to do/make a bungee jump

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Peter_Gabriel

Senior Member
Polish

Hi,

I am wondering if I can use 'to make a bungee jump' ?

I have seen this one in Guardian:

'Have you ever done a bungee jump? Tell us about it in the comments below or share a video of your experience via GuardianWitness'
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    You can use that variation, Peter, but it doesn't really add anything to the meaning of "do a bungee jump". "Make a bungee jump" sounds slightly odd to me, but it is easy to understand.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    In BE I think you'd have to use "do" or "have...done" - or "Have you ever gone bungee jumping?" would work.

    But I suspect "make a bungee jump" could well be construed as setting up the equipment for it.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I find "Have you made a bungee jump?" a wholly unremarkable question. It's comparable to "Have you made a parachute jump?", which to me is equally normal. I would never understand such questions to refer to building or making the equipment.

    If I had been the writer of the Guardian article, I would have used "made" and not "done".
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    I agree the sentence is correct but like owlman5, I find something odd about it. I keep reading it as: Have you forced a bungee to jump?:) (I don't feel that way about "made a parachute jump" however.)
     

    Peter_Gabriel

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I find "Have you made a bungee jump?" a wholly unremarkable question. It's comparable to "Have you made a parachute jump?", which to me is equally normal. I would never understand such questions to refer to building or making the equipment.

    If I had been the writer of the Guardian article, I would have used "made" and not "done".
    Why wouldn't you use 'done'?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I agree the sentence is correct but like owlman5, I find something odd about it. I keep reading it as: Have you forced a bungee to jump?:) (I don't feel that way about "made a parachute jump" however.)
    I think "make a parachute jump" is fairly standard.

    I had to make 10 jumps from 10,000 feet to qualify for special operations.

    By extension I would think the following was fine:

    We spent the entire afternoon making bungee jumps off the abandoned bridge.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I (and I think many other people) would just verb the noun.
    Have you ever bungee jumped? (Someone will tell me that needs a hyphen. ;))
     

    ewhite

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    I (and I think many other people) would just verb the noun.
    Have you ever bungee jumped? (Someone will tell me that needs a hyphen. ;))
    I agree with Myridon, and would have said so earlier if only I could have thought of the phrase "verb the noun". Aside from my native-speaker tendency to verb nouns, "Make a bungee jump" violates the not-quite-ironclad rule that I drum into my Spanish-speaking ESOL students: "do" refers to an action; "make" refers to the product of that action.

    And "do a bungee jump" just sounds wrong. One doesn't do a jump. One jumps.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I (and I think many other people) would just verb the noun.
    Have you ever bungee jumped? (Someone will tell me that needs a hyphen. ;))
    And "do a bungee jump" just sounds wrong. One doesn't do a jump. One jumps.
    Oxford Dictionaries Online agree with you, as they've done exactly that, listing the verb "to bungee", defining it as - [no object] Perform a bungee jump, with the example "He bungeed 111 metres from the bridge over the Victoria Falls". :)
     
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