to dominate on ice

Sept2.0

Member
Russe
Hello.
Is it possible to say
"Our team dominates on ice"
in English? Meaning they are favourites, they play better than the other team.
Do fans or sports commentators use it regularly when talking about hockey? More / less often than "Our team dominates the game"?
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    It is possible to say "Our team dominates on ice" but it would not be idiomatic in most contexts, as it would sound strange.
    Meaning they are favourites, they play better than the other team.
    It is not used to mean either of these things. It seems to be a general statement, rather than a specific one.

    When do you think you might say this, and to whom?
     

    Sept2.0

    Member
    Russe
    The expression is a literal translation of a Russian expression <...>, as in: <----Russian text removed by moderator (Florentia52)-----> Our (hockey) team "dominated the ice" / dominated on ice = dominated the game (during the first half of the game). What would a Canadian sports commentator normally say in this situation?
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Our (hockey) team "dominated the ice" = dominated on ice = dominated the game. :thumbsup:

    As it is ice-hockey, it would be incorrect to say "dominated on ice", because the only place that it is possible to "dominate" is "on ice."
     

    Sept2.0

    Member
    Russe
    Oh, yeah, I forgot. There's the other hockey, with no ice. The weird one. For Russians at least. We sort of think it's strange to play hockey without any ice. Anyway, yes, what I meant is the usual Canadian / Russian hockey rink with plenty of ice.

    Thanks, Paul.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It does in fact seem that "dominated the ice" and "dominated on the ice" (but not "dominated on ice") are fairly common expressions in descriptions of ice hockey games.
     

    WyomingSue

    Senior Member
    English--USA
    Certainly, the hockey team could "dominate" other teams, but I don't think we would say "dominates on ice" unless there were other possibilities, like dominating at cocktail parties or something. Which would certainly not be what they're being paid to do.
     

    kharlam

    Banned
    russian
    I admit I was a little sloppy using no article, but in general the expression is "legitimate". When used it in a conversation with my buddies, none voiced any objection to it.....I have to be more careful next time. Yet, if you go to NHL.com or any other sports media venue you may easily find "on ice" in many contexts. My guess is that due to saving spaces reporters just omit articles in writing.
     

    kharlam

    Banned
    russian
    Sept, thanks for introducing me to the forum. I guess it will come in handy for my next assignments:)
     
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