to eat up the miles

< Previous | Next >

jacdac

Senior Member
Lebanese
Once his breath was coming in gasps, Tallon slowed the pace to a steady jog, one that would eat up the miles and that he could maintain for hours. It was his default pace.
Source: The Jack Reacher Cases - Book 1 by Dan Ames
Context: Tallon is running.

What is your interpretation of eating the miles? easily defeat due to being powerful/good runner?

Thank you.
 
  • bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    I would say that "eating up the miles" would mean that he would traverse that distance rapidly: The miles would be figuratively "consumed" quickly or steadily. He would make steady, swift progress.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I agree with Kentix and bibliolept. You hear this more frequently with higher speed transport like a car, motorcyle, train, plane, etc. But jogging is certainly faster than walking, so this works here too.

    I don't think I would use "eat up the miles" for someone out for a leisurely stroll however.
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    I agree with Kentix and bibliolept. You hear this more frequently with higher speed transport like a car, motorcyle, train, plane, etc. But jogging is certainly faster than walking, so this works here too.
    With high-speed transportation, though, the reader may already assume a rapid pace. It wouldn't surprise me if writers often used "eat up the miles" or equivalents to describe jogging or brisk walking or other slower means of locomotion, when such a statement would be arguably less redundant.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Personally, I think it puts more emphasis on steadiness than speed. What eats up the miles is setting a pace and sticking to it. Stopping and starting kills your average.

    Tallon slowed the pace to a steady jog, one that would eat up the miles and that he could maintain for hours.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Personally, I think it puts more emphasis on steadiness than speed. What eats up the miles is setting a pace and sticking to it. Stopping and starting kills your average.

    Tallon slowed the pace to a steady jog, one that would eat up the miles and that he could maintain for hours.
    I guess the ability to cover long distance reigns superior to speed.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top