to encourage or as encouragement

Shohrat

Senior Member
Turkmen
Hello,

Could you please help me clarify the following:
I'd like to say: This certificate is issued to Mr. Tom Clinton to encourage him, because he has made outstanding achievements in 2010. I don't know which of my below options will convey this meaning better. I need to convey this meaning both formally and shortly.
This certificate is issued to encourage Mr. Tom Clinton for his outstanding achievements in 2010.
or
This certificate is issued to Mr. Tom Clinton as encouragement for his outstanding achievements in 2010.

Thanks in advance!
 
Last edited:
  • Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The first is much better in my opinion - in grammatical terms.

    I wonder however what you mean by 'encourage'. We encourage (instill courage into) people who lack courage in some respect.

    I don't think you wish to deprecate Mr. Clinton's achievements by implying they weren't courageous.

    (cross-posted)
     

    Shohrat

    Senior Member
    Turkmen
    Thank you, cyberpedant and Biffo. I understood your points. I really do not mean to deprecate his achievements, so I will use "reward" instead of "encourage".

    This certificate is issued to reward Mr. Tom Clinton for his outstanding achievements in 2010.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top