to enforce "God's will"

< Previous | Next >

hhtt

Senior Member
Turkish
Hi, "Azrael is a member of a group of assassins who were created by The Sacred Order of Saint Dumas to "enforce God's Will".

What does "to enforce God's will" refer to in the above sentence. Does "enforce" refer to "obtain by force."

Source: Batman Knightfall

Azrael (comics) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Thank you.
 
Last edited:
  • hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Why change from "enforce God's will" to "enforce the God's will"?
    What exactly is your question?
    It's just a typo. I am especially interested in enforce but "God's will" helps for determination. Would you like to explain them.

    Thank you.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    The word enforce means to make sure that people obey certain rules. For example, it is against the law to drive at more than 50 kph in towns in the UK. The police have the task of enforcing this law.

    God's will means what God wants and the group of assassins sees that the will of God is obeyed.
    I don't know how they know what he (or she:)) wants, but I presume that it is written down somewhere.
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    No, it means to carry out, or execute God's Will.
    In spite of they exactly correct, the dictionaries such as W.F do not agree with them. Can enforce also mean "do", "fulfill", "accomplish" , "run", "perform" ?

    Thank you.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Yes.

    The Sacred Order of Saint Dumas to "enforce God's Will". = The Sacred Order of Saint Dumas to "ensure that God's commands and wishes are carried out".
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    The word enforce means to make sure that people obey certain rules. For example, it is against the law to drive at more than 50 kph in towns in the UK. The police have the task of enforcing this law.

    God's will means what God wants and the group of assassins see that this is done
    .
    What does "see that this is done" refer to which is the part you have corrected. It seems strange to me. would you like to explain it?

    Thank you.
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Yes.

    The Sacred Order of Saint Dumas to "enforce God's Will". = The Sacred Order of Saint Dumas to "ensure that God's commands and wishes are carried out".
    Can we say "enforce God's Will".= Guarantee God's commands and wishes are executed?

    Thank you.
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    The word enforce means to make sure that people obey certain rules. For example, it is against the law to drive at more than 50 kph in towns in the UK. The police have the task of enforcing this law.

    God's will means what God wants and the group of assassins sees that the will of God is obeyed.
    I don't know how they know what he (or she:)) wants, but I presume that it is written down somewhere.
    Verb of "To make sure" seems that it refers to just watching and checking or at most reporting somewhere or somebody, but not directly doing that task. But the assassins directly do "God's will" by killing or threatening people considered in the wrong way. So is still "to make sure" fitting? Or I do not know "to make sure" enough?

    Thank you.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    To see/make sure/ensure that something happens is more than just checking that something is the case.
    It requires action (directly or indirectly) to bring about a result (e.g. Make sure that you lock your door when you go out).
    If we are talking abou assassins, we can assume that they act directly by killing someone.
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    To see/make sure/ensure that something happens is more than just checking that something is the case.
    It requires action (directly or indirectly) to bring about a result (e.g. Make sure that you lock your door when you go out).
    If we are talking abou assassins, we can assume that they act directly by killing someone.
    I am not very familiar with "make sure" so I would like to ask that: by killing someone directly, do assassins make sure the assassination?

    Thank you.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Ensure something = ensure that someone happens
    Make sure that something happens
    (not make sure something).

    Only ensure here is a transitive verb. But rather than say ensure an assination, you would more likely say carry out an assassination.
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Can we say that enforce: using force, brutal force, informal or formal authority such as of government to execute laws, commands or wills?

    Thank you.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    If the government wants to force people to obey the law, we can say to enforce legislation/the law. But this does not have to mean physical force.
    When I hear enforce used in this way, I think of the word strengthen (the force of the law).
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top