to entail vs to imply

Hi there,

could anyone explain to me what is exactly the difference between these to verbs and whether they can be interchangeable ?

This is the context:

The new changes entail a security issue
The new changes imply a security issue

Are they both correct ?, does the meaning change using one or the other?

Thanks in advance
 
  • horsewishr

    Senior Member
    English (Generic Midwest Variety)
    The best verb would be pose.
    Hmm. I think your interpretation points out the fact that the intention of both phrases is unclear.

    This is the way I see it:

    The new changes entail a security issue>> Security issues WILL be addressed as a part of the new changes (which are about to be implemented).

    The new changes imply a security issue>> The changes (that have already been made) suggest that there was (previously) a security problem.

    Your suggestion could be equally valid, depending on what the original poster really wants to say.
     
    Ok, I'll try to redefine the example using different words:

    The new changes will introduce security flaws into the software.

    So, can I use "to entail" or "to imply" in the way I said before?

    "The new changes entail/imply security issues"

    Thanks
     

    Chris K

    Senior Member
    English / US
    Ok, I'll try to redefine the example using different words:

    The new changes will introduce security flaws into the software.

    So, can I use "to entail" or "to imply" in the way I said before?

    "The new changes entail/imply a security issue"

    Thanks
    "To imply" would not be correct, as it means, roughly, "to provide evidence of/for." "Entail" is better but still not completely clear. "Pose" or "will introduce" are fine.
     
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