to every street hustler, (to every) lowlife

flamboyant lad

Senior Member
Hindi
Namaste teachers!

It's from the movie The Mask

Dorian to his boys:50 grand to the man who finds that green-faced son of a bitch before the cops do. I want you to get the word out to every street hustler, to every lowlife in this town.

If I cut off "to every" in the preceding dialogue, will the meaning remain same? e.g.
I want you to get the word out to every street hustler, lowlife in this town.

Thanks!
 
  • DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I think if you replaced the comma with "and":
    "I want you to get the word out to every street hustler and lowlife in this town",
    the meaning would then basically be the same. :)
     

    flamboyant lad

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Thanks Mr. DonnyB and Andygc for the replies.

    Which of the following sentences is more idiomatic?
    1. I want you to get the word out to every men, women and children in this town.
    2. I want you to get the word out to every men, to every women, to every children in this town.

    Thanks!
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Which of the following sentences is more idiomatic?
    1. I want you to get the word out to every men, women and children in this town.
    2. I want you to get the word out to every men, to every women, to every children in this town.
    In both cases you need the singular: "...to every man, woman and child..."

    Apart from that, either would work: (2) is just a more emphatic version of it. :)
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I would say 2 would be very unlikely. Number 1 would be what I expect 99% of the time.
     
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