To fall under/into a category

GandalfMB

Senior Member
Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
Hello,
Which version of the sentence sounds better to you: "He likes everything that falls into/under the category of traveling and photography"?
I think I'd go with "into", but some say it just doesn't fit the sentence.
 
  • GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    Thank you. Is it "come under" then? According to the dictionaries I referred to, "fall into" should probably be more common than my other suggestion. Dictionaries are not always right, though.
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    Hi Phoebe, sorry to disagree with hp, but falls under the category is fine, but less common (according to the Ngram) than falls into the category...
    Too much contemporary science writing falls under the category of 'infotainment' (The Guardian); This definitely falls under the category of “don’t try this at home.” (mprnews.org); A combination of disabilities (not including deaf-blindness) that restricts a child’s learning falls under the category of multiple disabilities. (cerebralpalsy.org)
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    "Falls into the category" is logical, because "it" is inside the category. "Falls under the category" rather means "falls under the heading" (which is logical too, yet it is used less often than "falls under the category": Google Ngram Viewer).
     

    Phoebe1200

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    Thank you, Vic.:)

    So can I use "Falls into the category" and "Falls under the category" interchangeably?
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    You can use them interchangeably. It just depends if the speaker imagines the category as something clearly delineated, something with a line all the way round it, in which case he will say fall into, or as a heading or the name of a list, in which case he may prefer to say fall under, but even with a list or a heading, you can still say fall into. I don't even think the speaker would make that distinction, in reality.
    If you Google the respective phrases, I think you'll find them used without any difference in meaning. Certainly in the examples I quoted in #7, either version could have been used in all the cases.
     

    Phoebe1200

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    You can use them interchangeably. It just depends if the speaker imagines the category as something clearly delineated, something with a line all the way round it, in which case he will say fall into, or as a heading or the name of a list, in which case he may prefer to say fall under, but even with a list or a heading, you can still say fall into. I don't even think the speaker would make that distinction, in reality.
    If you Google the respective phrases, I think you'll find them used without any difference in meaning. Certainly in the examples I quoted in #7, either version could have been used in all the cases.
    Thank you so much.:)
     
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