to fill, fulfill years (age)

Ilmo

Member Emeritus
In Finnish: Minä täytän 77 vuotta (= I will be 77 years old).
In Swedish: Jag kommer att fylla 77 år.
In Spanish: Voy a cumplir 77 años.

The verbs used in Finnish and Swedish mean "to fill" and the Spanish verb "cumplir" means more or less "to fulfill" or "to carry out".

Only in English there is no special verb for persons celebrating their birthdays (I don't consider "to be" or "to turn" such verbs).

I wonder, are there other languages that miss a verb to indicate that a person is just completing another year in his life?
 
  • parakseno

    Senior Member
    Romanian, Romania
    Romanian uses the verb "a împlini" which basically means "to fulfill".

    "Ţi-am împlinit dorinţa." - I fulfilled your wish.
    "Voi împlini 25 de ani anul viitor.2 - I'll be 25 next year.

    It's also possible to use the verb "a face" (to make): "Voi face 25 de ani anul viitor."
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    In Portuguese, you can say

    Vou cumprir 77 anos.

    like in Spanish, but this is very formal. Normally, you'd say

    Vou fazer 77 anos.

    Fazer means "to make". We "make" years.
     

    Lemminkäinen

    Senior Member
    Norwegian (bokmål)
    In Norwegian, you can say: Jeg kommer til å fylle 77 år, similar to Swedish.

    This, however, seems a bit old-fashioned. It'd be better to say Jeg kommer til å bli 77 år ("I'll become 77 years"), or even just Jeg blir 77 år ("I'm becoming 77 years").

    In Russian I'm pretty sure you'd say Мне будет 77 лет, "for me there will be 77 years".
     

    rocamadour

    Senior Member
    Italian
    In italiano: Compirò (compio) 77 anni.
    The verb is compiere (very similar to Spanish "cumplir"). You can both use it in the future (compirò) or present (compio).
     
    In French they talk about "révolu", which is not really fulfill, but to complete.

    For example:
    "L'école maternelle est ouvert aux enfants à partir de 2 ans révolus"
    (Pre-school is open to children 3 (entire) years old and over)

    I don't think this exists in English, we would just skip to the next birthday, and say the child must be three, instead of saying he must have completed his 2cd year in life.

    Does that make any sense at all?
     

    mcibor

    Senior Member
    In Polish we say "ukończyć" - complete

    Dopóki nie ukończysz osiemnastu lat masz wracać do domu przed dwudziestą pierwszą
    You have to come back home before 9 PM untill you finish 18.

    Regards
    Michał
     

    Etcetera

    Senior Member
    Russian, Russia (St Petersburg)
    In Russian, it's possible to say Мне исполнилось 77 лет. The verb исполниться here is quite close to the English "to fulfill". But it's a reflexive verb.
     

    germinal

    Senior Member
    England English
    Only in English there is no special verb for persons celebrating their birthdays (I don't consider "to be" or "to turn" such verbs).
    But in English we can say `In September I will have attained the age of 20 years.

    The above is very formal and normally one would say `I'll be twenty in September.`

    A child might say `I make up seven in September.`
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    But in English we can say `In September I will have attained the age of 20 years.

    The above is very formal and normally one would say `I'll be twenty in September.`

    [...]
    We have something similar in Polish:
    osiągnąć wiek = attain the age
    It also sounds formal (really formal).

    Apart from that we can also say:
    stuknąć-knock
    Stuknęła mi 40.


    Tom
     

    modus.irrealis

    Senior Member
    English, Canada
    In Greek, there's συμπληρώνω (simplirono) which has the "fill" idea - it actually matches up perfectly (or at least seems to), i.e. using the same prefix and base verb, with say the Spanish cumplir.

    But the word I hear most often is κλείνω (klino) whose basic meaning is "close", and a verb with that meaning doesn't seem to have been brought up so far.
     

    Maja

    Senior Member
    Serbian, Serbia
    In Serbian we "fill up/in" our years.

    Sutra punim petnaest godina. (Tomorrow I'll be 15.)
    On je juče napunio deset godina. (He was ten yesterday).

     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    In Czech, we can say "dovršit", which carries the idea of completion, rounding off. But it is rather formal. Normally, you would use "to be" or "to have". For higher ages, you can say something like reach but it would sound impolite for middle-aged people who wouldn't want to be considered seniors yet.

    Jana
     

    amikama

    a mi modo
    עברית
    In Hebrew it's possible to use the verb מָלֵא ("to fill") with years:
    .ימלאו לי 77 שנה
    But it sounds rather formal. Normally we use the word בן/בת (no equivalent in English, sorry) with ages:
    .אהיה בן/בת 77
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Here are the possibilities in Palestinian Arabic:

    راح أطبق السبعة وسبعين سنة (raH aTbo'/aTabbe' is-sab`a wsab`iin sane) - I will complete 77 years.
    راح أخلص السبعة وسبعين سنة (raH akhalles is-sab`a wsab`iin sane) - I will finish 77 years.
    راح أصير سبعة وسبعين سنة (raH aSiir sab`a wsab`iin sane) - I will become 77 years (old).
    راح يصير عمري سبعة وسبعين سنة (raH iySiir `umri sab`a wsab`iin sane) - My age [lit. life] will become 77 years.

    In Standard Arabic:

    سوف أكمل السابعة والسبعين من عمري (sawfa ukmilu 's-saabi`ata was-sab`iina min `umri) - I will complete the 77th (year) of my life.
     

    daoxunchang

    Senior Member
    Chinese China
    I think we have more nouns than verbs to express this idea. Oops, thinking about it, I think we have only one verb for this: 过spend
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    In Standard Arabic:
    سوف أكمل السابعة والسبعين من عمري (sawfa ukmilu 's-saabi`ata was-sab`iina min `umri) - I will complete the 77th (year) of my life.
    In Egypt we use the verb أكمل in colloquial : "7akammel sab3a w' sab3iin sana" حكمِّل سبعة وسبعين سنة

    I think the Standard would rather use the verb أتم :
    sawfa utimmu 's-saabi3ata was-sab3iina min 3umri
    سوف أتم السابعة والسبعين من عمري
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    The verbs used in Finnish and Swedish mean "to fill" and the Spanish verb "cumplir" means more or less "to fulfill" or "to carry out".
    ...
    I wonder, are there other languages that miss a verb to indicate that a person is just completing another year in his life?
    In Hungarian we use the same verb "fill" = betölt in fromal language.
    betölti a 20. életévét (present tense)
    betöltötte a 20. életévét (past tense)
     

    enoo

    Senior Member
    French - France
    French:
    Nothing about fullfilling I guess...
    Example:
    J'aurai X ans dans 2 mois - (verb avoir: to have. I'll have X years in 2 months)
    Or in a less common way, it's possible to say:
    J'atteindrai les X années dans 2 mois- (verb atteindre: to reach. "I'll reach X years in 2 months)
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    In English you can say "He has reached the age of 80".

    "Reach" here seems similar to "fulfil".
    This is an interesting point, but : is it?

    I think the underlying conception of years is quite different. Fulfilling implies, I think, seeing time as some kind of container to be filled, while reaching implies in my view a time perspective, maybe some kind of 'place' even - like reaching a town while travelling (life as a journey). Don't you think?
     

    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    I think the underlying conception of years is quite different. Fulfilling implies, I think, seeing time as some kind of container to be filled, while reaching implies in my view a time perspective, maybe some kind of 'place' even - like reaching a town while travelling (life as a journey). Don't you think?
    Yes, it seems like that. And what about "making" years? :)

    Romanian uses the verb "a împlini" which basically means "to fulfill".
    ...
    It's also possible to use the verb "a face" (to make): "Voi face 25 de ani anul viitor."
    In Macedonian it is "fulfill / fill up", but also "make" can be used too. When we talk about past, then the verb "наврши" can be used too, it somehow means "on-peak-ed", "reached-the-peak"; наврши > на-врх-и = "on-peak verb"; this verb also has the meaning of the English "do", like in "Врши работа." = "It does the job.".

    "fulfill / fill up": Утре полнам 18 години. (Útre pólnam 18 gódini.) = Tomorrow I'll be 18.
    "make": Утре правам 18 години. (Útre právam 18 gódini.) = Tomorrow I'll be 18.
    "on-peak-ed";
    "reached": Вчера навршив 18 години. (Včéra návršiv 18 gódini.) = I was 18 yesterday.
     
    Last edited:

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    In Catalan, as in Portuguese, complir is possible, but fer 'to make' is used much more often.

    · Compliré 77 anys.
    " I'll reach* 77 years"
    · Faré 77 anys.
    " I'll make (=celebrate/attain) 77 years "
    But as in Portuguese too, the Spanish word cumpleaños for birthday does not exist, and aniversari is used instead.


    *Note: complir (cumplir in Spanish, cumprir in Portuguese, etc) comes from Latin COMPLERE, and when applied to celebrating age should not be understood as 'fulfill' but rather as 'reach' or 'expire'.
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    In Spanish cumplir is fine but hacer (to make) is fine too; maybe a bit less formal than cumplir.

    the Spanish word cumpleaños for birthday does not exist, and aniversari is used instead.
    You should tell it to Rosalía... :)
    Background: Rosalía is a Catalan singer that used cumpleanys instead of the correct aniversari in one of her songs. She isn't the only one that makes that mistake.
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    You should tell it to Rosalía... :)
    Background: Rosalía is a Catalan singer that used cumpleanys instead of the correct aniversari in one of her songs. She isn't the only one that makes that mistake.
    Indeed :p. But I'm quite sure she used it deliberately, because her style in that song is the Catalan rumba, associated to Catalan gypsies. It can also be seen in another incorrect word that hasn't called so much attention, the verbal form *bautitzo instead of the correct batejo.
     
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