To find a hole in the market

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ThomasK

Senior Member
Belgium, Dutch
... is finding a very lucrative 'niche' in the market in Dutch (het gat [hole] in de markt vinden). For example: someone invents a product that seems to meet the needs of many - and that gives a boost to the sales straightaway. The link with the hole is that the products 'fills in' the needs (the 'hole').

Do you know that expression in your language? If not: what is the word 'hole' in your language?
 
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  • ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Thanks. I looked it up and did not find it. That is why I thought it was uncommon. But also a 'gap' then? I would not spontaneously associate it with a hole, though one could say the deep "hole" in-between is the very essence of a gap, indeed.
     

    Montesacro

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    ... is finding a very lucrative 'niche' in the market in Dutch (het gat [hole] in de markt vinden). For example: someone invents a product that seems to meet the needs of many - and that gives a boost to the sales ssraightaway. The link with the hole is that the products 'fills in' the needs (the 'hole').

    Do you know that expression in your language? If not: what is the word 'hole' in your language? Can it be used metaphorically (regarding consumption or in other contexts)?
    Well, "hole" can be translated into Italian as buco, buca, foro, etc., depending on the context.
    I guess that one can use the phrase "buco di mercato", but it is certainly much more common to speak of a "nicchia di mercato" (market niche).
     

    Montesacro

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    I see, thanks. And what verb do you use then ? Find, trovare? :tick:And (how) can you use those words metaphorically?
    Yes, we say "trovare una nicchia di mercato" (to find a market niche).
    Or "creare una nicchia di mercato" (to create a market niche).

    Or "occupare una nicchia di mercato" (to fill a market niche).
    "Occupare" literally means to take up a space, to occupy, to seize a place using force.
     

    ilocas2

    Banned
    Czech
    Czech:

    mezera na trhu - gap in the market
    díra na trhu - hole in the market

    najít mezeru/díru na trhu - to find a gap/hole in the market
    vyplnit mezeru/díru na trhu - to fill a gap/hole in the market
    etc. - more verbs are used with it - EDIT: zaplnit - to fill (in this concrete context it's synonymous with "vyplnit"), objevit - to discover, využít - to take advantage, ....
     
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    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    @ i: Thanks, ilocas, but could you mention the other verbs you use ?

    @both, if you don't mind :
    - I wonder how you both 'view' a gap in your language. Maybe you could try to find images showing me some typical examples of that. Dutch kloof (typical translation of gap): see here. I suppose you have different associations/ concepts linked with that...
    - As for the whole expression: do you mostly 'fill' the gap? I see 'occupare' and filling, but I'd say they are uncommon in Dutch.
     
    In Greek:
    «Ένα Κενό[1] στην αγορά[2]»
    'Ena ce'no stin aɣo'ra
    lit. "a gap/void in the market"

    [1]: Noun «κενό» (ce'no n.) from the Classical neuter noun «κενόν» (kĕ'nŏn)-->emptiness, void, PIE base *ḱen-, empty.
    [2]: Noun «αγορά» (aɣo'ra f.) deriving from the Classical one «ἀγορὰ» (ăgŏ'ră f.)-->init. assembly, place of assembly later, market, market-place, with obscure etymology (probably from PIE base *ger-, to collect).

    [ɣ] is a voiced velar fricative
    [c] is a voiceless palatal plosive
     

    mataripis

    Senior Member
    Tagalog: Hole= butas, but in this case the word "Nakalusot" is used. to find a hole in the market= makalusot sa Pamilihan o Kalakalan (Market or Trading). Makalusot is from root word "lusot" with english equivalent "Penetrate". or able to enter.
     
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