to <find a way round> something

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maestrícola

New Member
Spanish, Spain
Could anyone help me with the following activities?

I have to choose which answer A, B, C or D best fits each space:

1. The contract said we couldn't do it but our lawyer found a way __________ it.
A. round B. across C. off D. through

2. I was very late but I had just enough time to quickly ____________ to the shop.
A. stroll B. dash C. creep D. wander

Thank you very much!!!
 
  • maestrícola

    New Member
    Spanish, Spain
    In the first activity I would say "A. round" ("a way round it"), but I have no idea what it exactly means.

    In the second activity I am in doubt between "A. stroll" and "D. wander". I would say "A. stroll", because I think it means "a quick walk", while "D. wander" means "a slow walk". Am I right?

    Thanks
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    1. The contract said we couldn't do it but our lawyer found a way __________ it.
    A. round B. across C. off D. through

    2. I was very late but I had just enough time to quickly ____________ to the shop.
    A. stroll B. dash C. creep D. wander

    In the first activity I would say "A. round" ("a way round it"), but I have no idea what it exactly means.

    In the second activity I am in doubt between "A. stroll" and "D. wander". I would say "A. stroll", because I think it means "a quick walk", while "D. wander" means "a slow walk".
    Welcome to the forum. :)

    In American English, none of the choices offered for question (1) are correct; the right answer is around. But in British English, A ("round") is correct. To find a way around (or "round") something specified in a contract means to discover a legal way to interpret the contract that can permit what seems not to be possible.

    As to question (2), the only correct answer is B, dash. The speaker must move quickly, and dash is the only choice meaning that. "Stroll" means a slow, leisurely walk—not a quick one!
     
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