to/for what we're trying to accomplish.

lapot

Senior Member
Hello. I've come across the first of these sentences in an American TV show.

1) You know how important getting rid of him is to what we're trying to accomplish.
2) You know how important getting rid of him is for what we're trying to accomplish.

Can any one tell me if there is any difference between them? Or which one sounds better and why?
I'm really having a bad time trying to figure this out. Thanks!
 
  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I don't see any difference in meaning, or any superiority of one over the other. (Context might change that impression, but you haven't provided any.)
     

    lapot

    Senior Member
    Thanks Parla. Yes, I didn't provide more context, I thought it wasn't necessary in this case... Shame on me! :eek:

    It's from a conversation over the phone. Two people wanted to kill the leader from a corrupt organization. But the plan went wrong and the leader is still alive and kicking. Now, the person who tried to kill him is being berated for not getting things done.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    It's from a conversation over the phone. Two people wanted to kill the leader from a corrupt organization. But the plan went wrong and the leader is still alive and kicking. Now, the person who tried to kill him is being berated for not getting things done.
    Thanks, Lapot. It doesn't change my reaction; I think that either "to" or "for" works.
     
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