to get as fit as a fiddle from her cold

Thomas1

Senior Member
polszczyzna warszawska
Hello, :)


I have some doubts about the following sentence:

It didn't take much time for her to get as fit as a fiddle from her cold.

Is it correct please? I am mostly concerned about the underlined part.


Thank you in advacne,
Tom
 
  • idialegre

    Senior Member
    USA English
    It sounds wrong to me. "Fit as a fiddle" is a cute phrase, but you don't get fit from something. I would say,

    It didn't take much time for her to recover from her cold and feel fit as a fiddle again.

    Or

    It didn't take much time for her to recover from her cold; she was fit as a fiddle in just a few days.
     

    tepatria

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    "Fit as a fiddle" is a well used phrase, meaning you are very healthy. A fiddle is a violin, so you are as healthy as a violin. Does not make much sense, but we do say it. After she had a cold, it did not take her long to get healthy.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Thanks. :)

    Another question;
    I am looking for something that could be used as a synonym of recover, but it has to meet two conditions:
    1) it has to include get;
    2) it has to be inserted into the gap in the following:
    It didn't take much time for her to _________ her cold.
    The options I came up with:
    get back to health from
    get better from
    get over
    get past

    Do they work?

    Tom
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    "Fit as a fiddle" is a well used phrase, meaning you are very healthy. A fiddle is a violin, so you are as healthy as a violin. Does not make much sense, but we do say it. After she had a cold, it did not take her long to get healthy.
    If it means very healthy, what's wrong with it in my sentence, please?


    Tom
     

    tepatria

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Thanks. :)

    Another question;
    I am looking for something that could be used as a synonym of recover, but it has to meet two conditions:
    1) it has to include get;
    2) it has to be inserted into the gap in the following:
    It didn't take much time for her to _________ her cold.
    The options I came up with:
    get back to health from
    get better from
    get over
    get past

    Do they work?

    Get over would be the best, get better from and get past would not be incorrect, but not as common. Get back to health from is not a way I would use myself.

    Tom
     

    AWordLover

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hi,

    It's all about collocations.
    recover from X, you had X and got better

    It is not as common to say "get better from a cold/sickness".

    The following are (in my opinion) much more common.

    get better after X
    get back to health from after X
    get over X
    get better from treatment (the from means because of)
     
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