to git a pianer (piano?)

< Previous | Next >

kahroba

Senior Member
Persian
Dear friends
What's your interpretation for " we're going to git a pianer and live quiet" in the following context from "Manhattan Transfer" by Dos Passos:
Here's a dialogue between Ellen, who's escaping from her husband, and a taxidriver who has been thrown out by his wife:
"She says I git slopped too often. I aint goin back to her an I aint going to support her no more... I'm gettin an apartment on Twentysecond Avenoo wid another feller an we're goin to git a pianer an live quiet an lay offen the skoits."
"Matrimony isnt much is it?"
 
  • boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    She speaks in some accent apparently. She wants to get a piano and live quietly, although to me those are mutually exclusive, especially if you intend to actually play the piano. :D

    I am a lot more puzzled by those 'skoits'...
     

    kahroba

    Senior Member
    Persian
    She speaks in some accent apparently. She wants to get a piano and live quietly, although to me those are mutually exclusive, especially if you intend to actually play the piano. :D

    I am a lot more puzzled by those 'skoits'...
    It's taxidriver speaking dear boozer. "skoits" as far as I know means "skirts" i.e women!
     

    teksch

    Senior Member
    English - American
    She speaks in some accent apparently. She wants to get a piano and live quietly, although to me those are mutually exclusive, especially if you intend to actually play the piano. :D

    I am a lot more puzzled by those 'skoits'...
    Ah yes, pure Brooklyese? Wheah ya bin (Where have you been)? Fahgedaboudit (Forget about it)! Mean you gotta talk (Me and you have to talk). "skoits" (or, skirts for the purists) is a combination of English, Yiddish, Dutch, and a bit of German. This different style of English is probably based on the old Dutch - they were in New York first. As immigrants came to New York City, different sounds and meanings were added to an already complex language. Today, this altered form of English is spoken (or, at least understood) by the majority of people living in New York City. When Dos Passos was writing he tried to emulate the "street" language of the place and time he was writing about.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top