to give in to someone's wishes

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epistolario

Senior Member
Tagalog
I'm not sure if the phrasal verb give in is the correct expression here.

You want to eat at restaurant X, but your friend at restaurant Y. You give in to her wishes and decide to eat at restaurant Y because it's her birthday anyway.

You wait to paint the house blue but your employee want green. You give in to him and decide to let him choose the color because it is your gift to him, anyway, and he will be the one living there for the rest of his life or until he sells it.

What verbs or expressions do you use in these situations?
 
  • Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    Give in is probably the best term to use in your examples. You could also use relent. In some contexts you can 'bow to someone's decision', yeild, submit to pressure.
     

    Garbo

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    << Excessive deleted. >>

    Hi, ffrancis,

    Eliminate "anyway" at the end of your first sentece. It's better to add a phrase such as "after all it is her birthday."

    In the second sentence, use the conjunction and to signal the addition of a new clause.

    Hope this helps. :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    epistolario

    Senior Member
    Tagalog
    1. You want to eat at restaurant X, but your friend at restaurant Y. You give in to her wishes and decide to eat at restaurant Y because it's her birthday anyway.

    2. You wait to paint the house blue but your employee want green. You give in to him and decide to let him choose the color because it is your gift to him, anyway, and he will be the one living there for the rest of his life or until he sells it.
    Thanks for your comments. Just a follow up question: do the following sentences sound natural to you?

    1. [You are talking to a friend and trying to convince him] Let's give in to her wishes; after all, it's her birthday today.

    2. [You are talking to your employee, the recipient of the gift] I want to paint the house blue; but since it's my gift to you, I'll give in to you. (= I'll let you choose the color.]
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    In speech "Let's give in to her wishes" is not wrong, but sounds odd. "To give in " is colloquial whereas "wishes" in this case is formal.

    You might well say (talking to a friend) "Let's humour her" or "We should let her have her own way"or Let's give in to her."

    "I want to paint the house blue, but I give in; I'll let you choose the colour."
     
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