to go flat/to burst out

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GandalfMB

Senior Member
Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
Hello,
Do "On my way back, one of the tires went flat/burst out" sound fine? I would use "burst out". I think it's more sudden and violent. If one of the tires had a small hole in it, it would be likely to go flat by the morning. I think a tire would need some time in order to go flat, depending on the size of the hole.

What do you think?
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    In AE, the word used is "blowout" (Random House entry in WRF dictionary). BE speakers will tell us if that is also used in the UK. (It's never happened to me in a rental car on any of my return trips:D)
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    In AE, the word used is "blowout" (Random House entry in WRF dictionary). BE speakers will tell us if that is also used in the UK. (It's never happened to me in a rental car on any of my return trips:D)
    Ops...Ahh...my bad. Yes, it's "blowout" and I should have used "blow out" instead of "burst out". :( Arghh.....
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Many years ago, my tyre burst. Actually, it's happened three times to me and once was particularly exciting. But that's not really relevant. :)

    It's "my tyre burst" in BE. I think some BE speakers have picked up "I had a blowout", but I haven't.
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    Many years ago, my tyre burst. Actually, it's happened three times to me and once was particularly exciting. But that's not really relevant. :)

    It's "my tyre burst" in BE. I think some BE speakers have picked up "I had a blowout", but I haven't.
    Quite a lot of dictionaries say that "blow out" or even "blow" can also be used. Is any of that true?
    Thank you.
     
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