to go into production (IT related)

garconletton

Senior Member
Latvian
Hello!

Could anybody explain what does "go into production" mean in the context of software/system development life cycle? Does it mean that software is released to production environment i.e. made available for users?
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Yes, that's usually what it means, though not just made available for users; they should be really using it. The term "implementation" is also used.

    It can have a different meaning to people who work for software vendors that produce a product to put on shelves in stores.
     

    garconletton

    Senior Member
    Latvian
    Thank you!

    So, is "implementation in the production environment" the same as "going into production"? And what exactly does "implementation" imply? deployment (installation), usage and maintenance? or just usage?
     

    Waylink

    Senior Member
    English (British)
    Hello!

    Could anybody explain what does "go into production" mean in the context of software/system development life cycle? Does it mean that software is released to production environment i.e. made available for users?

    To "go into production" means that they started to make it. Typically, there will be a business case to be made, a detailed functionality specification and designing to be done.

    In the case of physical products, "to go into production" means that the raw materials and/or components are obtained and worked on (e.g. in a factory) to produce the finished item.

    In the case of software design and development, the boundary lines might be harder to specify, but I would still expect "to go into production" to be the process of making BEFORE being released to users.

    It's possible that user-testing is part of the production cycle, but nevertheless occurs before the product is considered to be fully "finished".


    EDIT: Having read the later responses I can see that the term "going into production" is used differently with regard to software and information systems development compared with say cars. "The Mini Cooper went into production on 1 May 19XX" means they started to produce those cars in the factory on 1 May 19XX, not that the public could buy and use them from that date.
     
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    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    ...In the case of software design and development, the boundary lines might be harder to specify, but I would still expect "to go into production" to be the process of making BEFORE being released to users.

    It's possible that user-testing is part of the production cycle, but nevertheless occurs before the product is considered to be fully "finished".
    I cannot speak for BE usage, but that is not the usual AE meaning of this phrase in the context of using software.
     

    djmc

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    BE usage normally implies that the software is released and that this is what being in production is. It may have been previously tested on specially chosen users.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Well, I found this http://commoninterview.com/Testing_Interview_Questions/what-is-sdlc-software-development-life-cycle/. Not sure if it is a trustable source but it says:

    (v) Production: After testing, the application (software) goes into production (meaning, it will be handed over to the owner).
    What they say looks reasonable, but this is a U.S. site (in the Seattle area) so it probably reflects AE. I'm still open to the possibility that BE usage may be different. Any IS types from "over there" want to chime in?
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Could anybody explain what does "go into production" mean in the context of software/system development life cycle?
    It means that a release of a software is installed in the "production environment". In corporate environments, there are typically at least three "environments" for each application the organization operates. An "environment" is a (physical or logical) server machine, a separate copy of the database and of the program code, called "development", "test" and "production", respectively. The "development environment" is where code is developed, system parameters defined, etc. When the developers/implementers release a version, the version is then transferred to the "test environment" which selected test user can access. Here the system works on a separate copy of the database, usually based on a copy of the production database which is refreshed at the beginning of each test cycle. When the release passes all test, it can "go into production". This means that the code is copied onto the production environment, the database(s) is/are updated. The release it then available to all users.

    The expression has a slightly different meaning, if a system is newly installed in an organization, as distinct from version upgrade of an existing system. "Going into production" means in this case that the organization starts to use the new system operationally. Typically, a new system runs in parallel for some time with one or more predecessor systems where the old system continues to be used operationally. The point of "going into production" is when the old system(s) is/are switched off, and the new system becomes operational.

    (I've been earning my living for more than 26 years with these things, so I should know.)
     

    Insom

    Member
    English - Australia
    As it is a software term, I doubt there is any AmE/BrE distinction at all. A "production" environment is where the software is 'live', i.e. in active use. You put code into production once it has been developed and tested. Compare this with development and testing environments.

    (edit: so basically, what berndf just said :) )
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    I agree that going into production means we are actually starting the manufacturing process. Software updates are researched very extensively before they go into production. If you went online on some of the major software companies, they sometimes have an experimental version of whatever they are perfecting, and you can sometimes get a free version of it, if you critique it. Only when all the kinks and bugs are worked out of a program will it go into production. When it goes into production, no more changes can be made.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Mjscott,

    You are mixing up internal deployment processes within organizations operating an application with release processes of software vendors to their clients. The expression going into production is normally used in the context of the former. In the latter context you sometimes use expressions like production release or stable release to explicitly distinguish them from beta releases; but going into production is not a commonly used term in that context; you call this process simply releasing.
     
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