To go to a tuition/ for a tuition

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Li singh

Senior Member
hindi
Hi
Whch of the following makes a good sense:
1) I go for a tuition.
2) I go to a tuition.
3) I go for tuition.
Thanks
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Hi Li singh,
    We really need some more information. Please try to explain exactly what you mean by "go to/for tuition".
     

    Li singh

    Senior Member
    hindi
    Hi Li singh,

    We really need some more information. Please try to explain exactly what you mean by "go to/for tuition".
    My issue is ' the displacement of a student from a place to the place where the 'tuition' is done'. It equals to ' I go to school'.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Maybe you mean "I go to a lesson/class." That could be a lesson in a class or a private lesson.

    I don't think you mean to say "tuition", whose meaning is less clear. "Tuition" is uncountable, so you can't go to "a tuition.".
     

    Li singh

    Senior Member
    hindi
    Maybe you mean "I go to a lesson/class." That could be a lesson in a class or a private lesson.

    I don't think you mean to say "tuition", whose meaning is less clear. "Tuition" is uncountable, so you can't go to "a tuition.".
    I agree with you. Tuition is an uncountable noun. The more I want to know from you is about the preposition. Which is the better, 'to' or ' for'( when used before tuition)
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Note that in I go for tuition you aren't saying what you go to but explaining why you go.

    To say what you are going to, we'd say, in BE (British English), I'm going to a lesson.

    At some universities they say I'm going for a tutorial, but that's not in general use, I'd say.
     
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    English nerd

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    And if we have to specify the place as well:
    I go for tuition to Edunext. (It is the name of a place that "gives tuitions to students).

    And what sounds better "tuition" or "coaching"
    Thank you:)
     
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    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    you aren't saying what you go to
    Actually he is, but he's using the word in a meaning that might not be familiar to people outside the subcontinent. In India, the word "tuition" is often used to mean additional/supplementary classes that a student attends outside regular school or college, usually to prepare for school-leaving exams or university entrance exams.

    I go for tuition to Edunext. (It is the name of a place that "gives tuitions to students).
    If you're speaking to an Indian who know what Edunext is, that's fine. Otherwise, I suggest something like I go to an institution called Edunext for private/extra classes/tuition in [subject].
     

    English nerd

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Note that in I go for tuition you aren't saying what you go to but explaining why you go.
    Actually he is, but he's using the word in a meaning that might not be familiar to people outside the subcontinent.
    Barque, I didn't quite get you. Wasn't it just used for "why he goes" and not "where he goes"? If I use "I go for tutions" I'd use it to mean that "I am taking tuition in a particular subject", and for the place, I'd mention the place.Tuitions are just private classes taken by tutors, right? [But is this the way it's used in BrE?]

    And that is what I use "tuition" for. I used it to mean that I go to take tuition in a few subjects to X.

    Won't it be used that way in BrE?
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    If I use "I go for tutions" I'd use it to mean that "I am taking tuition in a particular subject"
    Thomas Tompion, I believe, interpreted this as meaning - I go to receive tuition, as a reason or a statement of why.

    I believe the OP meant: I go to extra classes. That's a statement of where.

    Tuitions are just private classes taken by tutors, right?
    No. Did you look in the dictionary? Tuition refers to teaching or instruction. What you receive at your regular school is tuition too. It's only in India as far as I know that the word "tuition" is used to refer specifically to extra/private classes.
     
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    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    The point is that your sentences about going for tuition do not convey any meaning. That's because they have no ocntext and you provide no reason for saying them so we don't know what you might be talking about.
    "My maths is very bad so I'm getting some tuition" means in British English that you are getting extra lessons probably with a private tutor, at his home or yours, or increasingly nowadays on-line.
    If you explaining why you are going out, in reply to "Where are you going?", you might then use 'going to my maths tutor for a lesson'.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Tutoring is the word for private tuition. Tuition means being taught, in general. Boarding schools charge for tuition and board or keep. Those students who are not boarders but 'day pupils' pay tuition fees.
     

    English nerd

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    So I guess this is a cultural difference and the usage will not be similar due to different cultures....

    Thomas Tompion, I believe, interpreted this as meaning - I go to receive tuition, as.a reason or a statement of why.
    But won't that mean the same thing in my sentence too?
    I go for tuition to Edunext.
    That will be: I go for receiving tuition to Edunext. (The only difference here will be that it can be in "school" for Brits but it is something "private" in India)
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    So I guess this is a cultural difference
    It's not a "cultural" difference. The phrase originally used was probably "private tuitions" which must have then got shortened to just "tuition", with the result that people started to think "tuition" specifically referred to private classes outside regular school. It arises from the fact that English is a second or third language to most Indians.
    (The only difference here will be that it can be in "school" for Brits but it is something "private" in India)
    No. The use of "tuition" to mean specifically private tutoring is wrong. There are also many Indians who use the word "tuition" correctly. "Tuition" just means "lessons" or "teaching" (noun, not verb) or "instruction" (used uncountably).
     
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