To grab a ride...

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ilMedioevale

New Member
Italian
Hello

I'm reading a book about the History of Rock and Roll and in the very first paragraph I found a very hard sentence. It is in the "Introduction" chapter:

"This book is written to be read fron the first page to the last, telling a story in sequential form, just like any other narrative history. It's possible to do this at much greater lenght and much greater detail but I wanted to make this story thorough yet accessible to the kind of people who don't enjoy gigantic reads as much as I do. I also wanted to try to impart the excitement I experienced once I grabbed a ride on what turned out to be a lot more than popular music, a corner that was turned after this book's narrative ends, but one we can see approaching in its last pages."

I really cannot undestand the meaning here of the verb "I grabbed a ride...", the supposed inconsistency ot the two tenses "was turned ... ends" and of the general sense of the whole bolded sentence.
Can someone please help me?
 
  • rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    The writing is a little cumbersome. Let's see if I can break it down for you a bit. Now, the author has chosen to write about a certain time period that they found particularly exciting, the time period itself and the research they did. The book will tell a story with a certain time line. At the end of this time line, after the book is finished some milestone was reached. Some big event happened. Does this make it any clearer?
     

    ilMedioevale

    New Member
    Italian
    Hello rrose17, thank you for your answer.

    So... "I grabbed a ride" means "to have written the whole book" or "to have finished to write the book"?
    And that "corner" could be a "milestone"?
    This makes it much more clear, indeed.
    But I still have some dubt about the last part of the sentence "but one we can see approaching in its last pages". Why "but" and which "one"?
    Thank you
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    So... "I grabbed a ride" means "to have written the whole book" or "to have finished to write the book"?
    No, sorry I wasn't clear. The author is comparing this incredibly exciting project that they're working on to a moving vehicle and they "jumped on board" as it were. It's a bit forced, in my opinion. They are trying very hard to make you believe this is just so exciting!! They grabbed a ride, here, means that they did the research and it was a bit wild. The final "but" is not necessary. And "one" can be replaced with "you".
     
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