to grope (trainee or new employee)

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epistolario

Senior Member
Tagalog
Let's say, in your workplace a tenured employee resigned, and he was replaced by a new employee (trainee). In this context, we would use the verb grope (figuratively) in our language, like grope in the dark:

Don't be so impatient with our new colleague because he is still groping.

I want to verify this with you because in my dictionary, the only figurative usage of the verb grope that I have seen is groping for words.
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I would not use groping in this context. Learning would fit nicely.

    Groping, unless it is followed by something that clearly indicates what is being groped for, and that something is asexual, is likely to be associated with sexual activity. Compare these two examples from the BNC.
    Finally, he stepped inside, groping for the light switch.
    He and Helga sat at the back of the class, groping each other up in a flurry of smirks and giggles.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I would say "He is still finding his way (around)"

    Groping ( intrans) is fine as part of an expression meaning 'looking for' or 'trying to find' but by itself it isn't acceptable.

    Used transitively it means touching in a sexual way, sometimes called "feeling up" or "touching up".

    From the title, I thought your post was going to be about that activity.

    :)

    Hermione
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I had a few colleagues who groped the secretaries. Only some of the secretaries liked it.

    When people start a new job, they spend some time learning the ropes, settling down, and figuring things out.
     
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