to grow economies/by growing economies

Kacy.H

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, people. I wrote them. Which one is better?

The only way to eliminate poverty is to grow economies.

The only way to eliminate poverty is through/by growing economies.
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    This use of "grow" as a transitive verb is still disliked in ordinary BrE. We are happy to grow carrots, but we don't like growing businesses or economies, although this use of "grow" is widely used in business English.

    You second sentence is also problematical with "by", which appears to suggest that "growing" is a gerund, making "economies" its object, which has the same objection as the first sentence. However, with "through", we can read "growing" as an adjective, which is fine.
     

    Kacy.H

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thank you, Uncle Jack. Are they all correct now?

    The only way to eliminate poverty is to boost economies.

    The only way to eliminate poverty is by boosting economies.

    The only way to eliminate poverty is through growing/boosting economies.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Boost"/"boosting" can only be a verb, not an adjective, so you cannot really compare "growing" and "boosting" in the last sentence. They are all fine, so far as they go, but "boost" suggests a rapid short-term growth that is not sustained, which does not appear to fit. "Make economies grow" would be better than "boost", in my opinion, if you particularly want an action.
     

    Kacy.H

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    This use of "grow" as a transitive verb is still disliked in ordinary BrE. We are happy to grow carrots, but we don't like growing businesses or economies, although this use of "grow" is widely used in business English.
    Uncle Jack, what's about "grow your career"? Is this still disliked? Is "develop your career" better?

    The normal path to growing your career is non-existent. (Source: TechCrunch)
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Uncle Jack, what's about "grow your career"? Is this still disliked?
    I think so. It is often hard to tell when business English becomes acceptable in other situations. A business might well say that they will be able to "grow your career" in a job advertisement, and a writer of business books might use the term as your source has done, and I suppose that some readers might like this usage, but it still sounds odd to me. "Develop" is fine.
     
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