to have a 'disturbed/sick mind

Birdseed98

Banned
English - Scotland
When someone is described as having a sick mind, is this ambiguous and depends on the context or is there a general definition for the term?

Is there a difference between one having a 'disturbed mind' and a 'sick mind'?
 
  • Birdseed98

    Banned
    English - Scotland
    Please give us the complete sentence in which you found, or would use, the phrase, along with some context.
    I heard someone describe another person as having a 'disturbed and sick mind.'

    I didn't get to hear the conversation, does these mean the person has a mental disorder or what exactly?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hello Birdseed
    A 'disturbed and sick mind' is the sort of thing people say when they mean to suggest that a person may have a mental disorder. It is highly subjective. I suppose that all it usually means is that the speaker has very different opinions from the person they're talking about. There are many politicians these days who some people think have mental disorders, but whose views other people support.
    All depends on who is speaking and who they're speaking about.
    :)
     

    Birdseed98

    Banned
    English - Scotland
    Hello Birdseed
    A 'disturbed and sick mind' is the sort of thing people say when they mean to suggest that a person may have a mental disorder. It is highly subjective. I suppose that all it usually means is that the speaker has very different opinions from the person they're talking about. There are many politicians these days who some people think have mental disorders, but whose views other people support.
    All depends on who is speaking and who they're speaking about.
    :)
    Hello,

    I agree with you that it's highly subjective because it's highly ambiguous and depends on the context. I bet it's sometimes used as a tongue in cheek saying.

    I can't say I've heard the phrase used too many times though and when I have it's normally been about serial killers, etc.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's what I might say as a kind and hesitant euphemism, if I think somebody has some sort of mental disorder, especially a personality disorder, let's say something like 'narcissism'.

    Even if I were a psychiatrist or psychologist, I expect I wouldn't want to seem to be diagnosing people. That might be unethical. As a non-medically trained person, I try to avoid casually describing people in terms of well -established mental illness.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top