''to have a value in money'' with or without Worth

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ullas84

Senior Member
turkish
CONTEXT:
Longman dictionary

Worth: To have a value in money

Ex:
1)The house must be worth quite a lot of money now.
2)One of the pictures is worth $50.000
3)Do you know how much the ring is worth

Can I make these sentences in a structure without 'Worth' in the same meaning??

1*)The house must be quite a lot of money now.
2*)One of the pictures is $50.000
3*)Do you know how much the ring is
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    1. You can.
    2. This gives the price, not the worth/value. The latter is usually an estimate.
    3. This asks the price, not the worth/value.
     

    ullas84

    Senior Member
    turkish
    :) I checked e mail ,just a part of your message was in the mail 'yes you can'.
    Now I see full message.
    Thanks for the reply
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Longman dictionary Worth: To have a value in money
    I think that would be better expressed as "to be Worth: To be given a/the value of [expressed in in money.]"

    For example, there are probably items that I would pay £100 for so, to me they are worth £100 - I would give it a value of £100. If you do not like the item, then to you it is worth, perhaps £20 - you would give it a value of £20.

    An art teacher once said to me "A painting is worth what someone will pay for it." :)
     

    ullas84

    Senior Member
    turkish
    I think that would be better expressed as "to be Worth: To be given a/the value of [expressed in in money.]"

    For example, there are probably items that I would pay £100 for so, to me they are worth £100 - I would give it a value of £100. If you do not like the item, then to you it is worth, perhaps £20 - you would give it a value of £20.

    An art teacher once said to me "A painting is worth what someone will pay for it." :)
    Thanks for the :thumbsup:detailed answer
     
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