To have something stick in one's craw?

< Previous | Next >

High on grammar

Senior Member
Farsi
Hello everyone:

I understand that the expression [ To have something stick in one's craw] means to have something irritate you; my question is about the grammatical construction of this idiom:

Should I say, for instance, [ I'm not going to have his words stick in my craw] or [I'm not going to have his words stuck in my craw]?

Thanks
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    [ I'm not going to have his words stick in my craw] or [I'm not going to have his words stuck in my craw]?
    Both sentences look possible to me, High on Grammar. When I hear people use "stick in my craw", they generally use some pronoun like "it" rather than a noun phrase like "his words": Did you hear how rude he was? Don't let it/that stick in your craw. Who cares what he says?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top