to his mother?

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laoghaire

New Member
chile
¿Porqué en esta frase se omite la preposicion to?

'No doubt they would finally banish him from their clan just as they had done his mother'

¿No podría ser TO his mother?

Gracias
 
  • fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    laoghaire said:
    ¿Porqué en esta frase se omite la preposicion to?
    A mí me suena mejor con "to", para aproximar un inglés americano hablado. Sin embargo, suena bien aquí porque en inglés, normalmente se omite la "a" (to) personal.

    Saludos.
     

    Swettenham

    Senior Member
    U.S.
    laoghaire said:
    ¿Porqué en esta frase se omite la preposicion to?

    'No doubt they would finally banish him from their clan just as they had done his mother'

    ¿No podría ser TO his mother?

    Gracias
    De acuerdo con Fenixpollo. Suena más natural con to, más literario sin to.

    La to puede ser escrita o tácita.
     

    Swettenham

    Senior Member
    U.S.
    fenixpollo said:
    A mí me suena mejor con "to", para aproximar un inglés americano hablado. Sin embargo, suena bien aquí porque en inglés, normalmente se omite la "a" (to) personal.

    Saludos.
    ¿Es verdad que inglés tiene la "a" personal? No lo creo...
     

    swift_precision

    Senior Member
    US/English
    Swettenham said:
    ¿Es verdad que inglés tiene la "a" personal? No lo creo...
    No. No creo que la "a" personal no existe en inglés como en español. La "a" como se ve en ingles escrita y como se oye en ingles hablado existe como un articulo.
     

    Swettenham

    Senior Member
    U.S.
    swift_precision said:
    No. No creo que la "a" personal no existe en inglés como en español. La "a" como se ve en ingles escrita y como se oye en ingles hablado existe como un articulo.
    Heeheehee:D Thanks, Swift, but I know "a" is an article. I meant that the preposition "to" does not have the character or quality that its Spanish equivalent, "a," has. I meant to say that English does not have a personal "to."

    En español, se dice:

    Yo amo mi casa.
    Yo amo a Juanita.

    En inglés se dice:

    I love my house.
    I love Juanita.

    In the example presented by Laoghaire, it does not make a difference that the "to" applies to a person.

    'No doubt they would finally banish him from their clan just as they had done his mother'

    You could just as well say:

    "No doubt they would do damage to his house, just as they had done his car."

    ¿Verdad? :)
     

    swift_precision

    Senior Member
    US/English
    Swettenham said:
    Heeheehee:D Thanks, Swift, but I know "a" is an article. I meant that the preposition "to" does not have the character or quality that its Spanish equivalent, "a," has. I meant to say that English does not have a personal "to."

    En español, se dice:

    Yo amo mi casa.
    Yo amo a Juanita.

    En inglés se dice:

    I love my house.
    I love Juanita.

    In the example presented by Laoghaire, it does not make a difference that the "to" applies to a person.

    'No doubt they would finally banish him from their clan just as they had done his mother'

    You could just as well say:

    "No doubt they would do damage to his house, just as they had done his car."

    ¿Verdad? :)
    Yep as you said English doesn't have that personal "a" like in Spanish and both sentences sound ok to me although for the second sentence I would say "No doubt they would do damage to his house, just as they had done damage to his car" This is just my personal preference however and it will probably vary depending on who you ask.
     

    swift_precision

    Senior Member
    US/English
    Swettenham said:
    Heeheehee:D Thanks, Swift, but I know "a" is an article. I meant that the preposition "to" does not have the character or quality that its Spanish equivalent, "a," has. I meant to say that English does not have a personal "to."

    En español, se dice:

    Yo amo mi casa.
    Yo amo a Juanita.

    En inglés se dice:

    I love my house.
    I love Juanita.

    In the example presented by Laoghaire, it does not make a difference that the "to" applies to a person.

    'No doubt they would finally banish him from their clan just as they had done his mother'

    You could just as well say:

    "No doubt they would do damage to his house, just as they had done his car."

    ¿Verdad? :)
    coño! I forgot you're from the US. Disculpame.
     

    gotitadeleche

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. English
    Swettenham said:
    In the example presented by Laoghaire, it does not make a difference that the "to" applies to a person.

    'No doubt they would finally banish him from their clan just as they had done his mother'

    You could just as well say:

    "No doubt they would do damage to his house, just as they had done his car."

    ¿Verdad? :)
    Neither one of those sentences sound right to me without "to" in the second part. We always DO something TO someone.
     
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