'to' in the end of a sentence.

eksena

New Member
Russian
Hello, friends.
I wonder if the following sentence is correct:

I've never been lucky and I never wanted to'

implying 'I never wanted to be lucky'

Thanks in advance.
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hello Eksena. The to is fine but for maximum elegance you really need to have the same tense in both halves of the sentence:
    I've never been lucky and I've never wanted to
    :)
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Hello, friends.
    I wonder if the following sentence is correct:

    I've never been lucky and I never wanted to'

    implying 'I never wanted to be lucky'

    Thanks in advance.
    Hi. As well as ewie's tense change there is something I find odd about the phrase. I would say

    "I've never been lucky and I've never wanted to be".

    I don't know whether I'd go as far as to say that the original version ending "to" was "wrong" but it seems a bit strange to me.
     

    eksena

    New Member
    Russian
    Hi, Ewie,
    I really thought about tenses, and the reason I used Past Indef. in the second part was that I wanted to emphasize the idea that I didn't want to be lucky earlier; now, after having been unlucky for many years :) I don't mind having a bit of luck. :)
    It might be too complicated for one sentence, though.

    Thank you very much.
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    I half agree with ewie.

    It needs to have the same tense in both halves, but even then I want "to be"

    For my ears, it has to be "I've never been lucky and I've never wanted to be"

    May be it's something to do with the verb to be.
    With other verbs, it's different.
    I've never eaten snails and I have never wanted to.
    I've never seen "The Da Vinci Code" and I've never wanted to.

    And it should be "to at the end of a sentence".
     
    Last edited:

    eksena

    New Member
    Russian
    Hi. As well as ewie's tense change there is something I find odd about the phrase. I would say

    "I've never been lucky and I've never wanted to be".

    I don't know whether I'd go as far as to say that the original version ending "to" was "wrong" but it seems a bit strange to me.
    Hi, Timpeac.
    Thanks for your variant.

    Correct me, please, if I got it wrong:

    "I've never been lucky and I've never wanted to be". - more formal

    "I've never been lucky and I've never wanted to". - can be used informally
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Now that you mention it, Tim (and Brio and Shawnee), I see what you mean: I think it does sound better with that extra be on the end.

    Yes Eksena, that's quite a lot of stuff to cram into one short sentence. How about:
    I never used to be lucky - I never wanted to be - but now I've changed.
    I like Shawnee's alternative version too:)
     
    Last edited:

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Hi, Timpeac.
    Thanks for your variant.

    Correct me, please, if I got it wrong:

    "I've never been lucky and I've never wanted to be". - more formal

    "I've never been lucky and I've never wanted to". - can be used informally
    No - I wouldn't say so. It's true that there are some people who would consider finishing a sentence with a preposition as informal, but here the sentence just seems unfinished to my ear.

    By contrast you could say "I've never been to Rome and I've never wanted to" or "I've never played the drums and I've never wanted to" without problem.
     
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