To its detractors, of which there is many, the book

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dreamlike

Senior Member
Polish
Hi everyone

Let's take the following sentence:

To its detractors, of which there is many, the book did not seem as compelling.

Is it perfectly clear that the part in bold refers to 'detractors'? I would have no doubts whatsoever if the sentence read 'of which there is a shortage', but as it stands it seems odd to me.

source: the sentence is of my autorship...
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hi dreamlike

    It doesn't just sound odd to me - it sounds ungrammatical (I would have expected "of which there are many"). Where did you find this?

    Cross-posted with pob.
     

    dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    It seems so to me.

    Can I ask what it is that makes you feel 'a shortage' would be more indicative than 'many'?
    I did not mean to say that they have something in common. of which there is a shortage sounds normal to me, but 'of which there are many/few' does not. I would normally try and convey the idea in some other way, but it does not hurt to learn a new construction.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    "Of which there are many" actually sounds "more normal" to me than the other, dreamlike (although really, both sound fine).

    I'm assuming you meant "of which there is no shortage" if you want the same meaning as "of which there are many."
     

    dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    "Of which there are many" actually sounds "more normal" to me than the other, dreamlike (although really, both sound fine).

    I'm assuming you meant "of which there is no shortage" if you want the same meaning as "of which there are many."
    Yeah, that's what I meant to say. In which case I guess I could use the expression 'who are not in short supply', but I want to be more explicit by using the word 'many'.
     
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