to leave the house in a blaze of fury

< Previous | Next >

jacdac

Senior Member
Lebanese
Her husband was working a night shift at the hospital, and had left the house in a blaze of fury. Nothing new there. But the quarrels were becoming too frequent, and Sue was at her wits’ end.
Source: Murderer’s son by Joy Ellis


If you go out in a blaze of glory, you do something very dramatic at the end of your career or your life which makes you famous.

What about if you leave the house in a blaze of fury?

Thank you.
 
  • Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    You're very angry. ;)
    :thumbsup: In fact very, very angry! :D

    Anger is usually described as a "hot" emotion. A "blaze" is a very large or fiercely burning fire, and "fury" is wild or violent anger. Therefore we have the mental image of a rage so extreme that it was metaphorically like a huge or out of control fire. One imagines much shouting, ranting, raving, stomping of feet, the front door slamming with such force that the windows rattle and finally the car speeding away like Lewis Hamilton from the starting grid.
     

    Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    No, Jacdac. I've never heard it used in that way. A pang (a sudden sharp pain or emotion, a bit like a "stabbing pain") I see as something which is quite short-lived. It comes on quickly and is often soon forgotten. Therefore someone might have a passing "pang of guilt" for example. "Fury" is so intense that it usually gives the idea of being quite long-lasting.

    A "blaze" of fury is something which might take a while to get started but once it does it is all-consuming and quite long-burning. I can imagine the husband in the OP still ranting and raving to himself for a good while after leaving the house.

    The mental image I have of a blaze of fury is something like these pictures. The man's anger is so intense that it will take a good while to put it out.



     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top