To listen (+ prep.)

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Welsh_Sion

Senior Member
Welsh - Northern
Anybody want to add to this list? Adding the English equivalents (as this seems our universal language here) would also highlight the differences. Thanks.

English - to listen to
Welsh - gwrando ar (to listen on)
French - écouter Ø (to listen Ø)
 
  • Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek lacks infinitive, so I'll use the first person singular present indicative:
    ακούω Ø (to listen Ø)
    Ex. Ακούω μουσική (to listen to music)
    [akúo musikí]

    But there's also the structure ακούω (κάποιον) να + verb , eg. to listen (someone) + ing form of a verb.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    The basic Russian verb слушать (slúshat') takes only direct objects (+ acc.).
    Still it has various derivates with more nuanced and/or modified meanings, which can take prepositional phrases as objects.
    E.g. прислушиваться к (prislúshivat'sya k) +dat. - to listen closely to sth (lit. ~towards-listen-oneself to...);
    or вслушиваться в (vslúshivat'sya v) + acc. with a similar meaning (but limited to inanimate nouns decribing sounds, lit. ~inlisten-oneself in...).
     
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    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Dutch:
    - luisteren naar (mostly, there is a tendency towards a version without naar)...
    - beluisteren is the same but more formal, not perfectly interchangeable: in most case the be- replaces some kind of "on" (antwwoorden op W>> beantwoorden, spelen op > bespelen and thus turns a V + prep LOCA into a transitive verb, but containing some idea of controlling, mastering, etc.
     

    Dymn

    Senior Member
    Spanish:
    Escuchar Ø (to listen) (something)
    Escuchar a (to listen to) (someone)
    This is misleading because you will always have the preposition "a" when introducing an animate direct object in Spanish. Like you would say "matar a alguien" ("to kill to somebody"). But the syntax is just like French or Portuguese (it's a transitive verb).

    Catalan: escoltar Ø (to listen Ø)
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    I do not know whether this is relevant, but I am fairly sure that é-couter and es-cuchar consist of a prefix and a stem. Just like auscultare… The prefix might (might, might) be a preposition into the verb. But I'll check on that…

    However: auscult- is supposed to be based on auris, ear, or that is what Etymonline.com tells us. Ecouter might be based on a suffix though, if I get crntl.fr well.
     

    Dymn

    Senior Member
    What I understand is that auscultare was simplified to ascultare in Vulgar Latin (which is the modern Italian form), whereas Western Romance languages interpreted the initial syllable as the more common prefix es- (which then changed to é- in Modern French), as if derived from *scultare.

    Compare obscurus which rendered oscuro in Spanish but escuro in Portuguese.
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Hungarian
    hallgat + accusative
    hallgat + valakire ("on somebody") -- it means you listen to someone & what's more you follow his advice.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Greek lacks infinitive, so I'll use the first person singular present indicative:
    ακούω Ø (to listen Ø)
    Ex. Ακούω μουσική (to listen to music)
    [akúo musikí]

    But there's also the structure ακούω (κάποιον) να + verb , eg. to listen (someone) + ing form of a verb.
    Just noting that Greek is one of the languages that don't make the hear v listen to distinction. Or is it that English is one of the few languages that do make the distinction? I've no idea
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Just noting that Greek is one of the languages that don't make the hear v listen to distinction. Or is it that English is one of the few languages that do make the distinction? I've no idea
    Certainly English isn't one of the few languages here. While the concepts are often expressed by morphologically related verbs (in Russian and many other Slavic languages, in Arabic etc.), contrasting them is pretty common.
     

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Just noting that Greek is one of the languages that don't make the hear v listen to distinction.
    True.
    Certainly English isn't one of the few languages here. While the concepts are often expressed by morphologically related verbs (in Russian and many other Slavic languages, in Arabic etc.), contrasting them is pretty common.
    I'd like also to know if this is the case for the Romance languages or other languages that are mentioned here.
     

    Dymn

    Senior Member
    In European Portuguese, escutar is not a very common verb and ouvir is usually used for both concepts.
    In Spanish, you will never be wrong if escuchar = to listen, oír = to hear, but you will often find escuchar to be used for the other meaning.
    In Catalan, the distinction (escoltar = to listen, sentir = to hear) is well kept except for people who are the most influenced by Spanish.
     

    symposium

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    In Italian:
    ascoltare = to listen ("sto ascoltando una canzone" = "I'm listening to a song")
    sentire = to hear ("ho sentito un rumore" = "I heard a noise")
    One verb cannot substitute the other.
     

    AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    English - to listen to
    Welsh - gwrando ar (to listen on)
    French - écouter Ø (to listen Ø)
    Hungarian - hallgat + accusative suffix -t (Péter Beethovent hallgat. = Peter listens to Beethoven.)

    Just noting that Greek is one of the languages that don't make the hear v listen to distinction. Or is it that English is one of the few languages that do make the distinction? I've no idea
    While the concepts are often expressed by morphologically related verbs (in Russian and many other Slavic languages, in Arabic etc.), contrasting them is pretty common.
    Yes, the two concepts are expressed by related verbs in Hungarian (hall = hear vs. hallgat = listen) and German (hören = hear vs. zuhören = listen), but not in Baltic languages (Lithuanian girdėti, Latvian dzirdēt = hear vs. Lith. klausyti, Latv. klausīt = listen).
     

    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    German:

    "to-listen": zuhören (people and other living beings), e.g. "dem Redner zuhören" (listen to an orator)
    "on-listen": anhören (abstract things like a presentation/music), e.g. "sich die Rede anhören" (listen to an oration)
     
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