to liven up [..] with some fully-fledged warfare

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esperansa

Senior Member
Russian
Hi.

Explain please the meaning of "to liven up a tea party with some fully-fledged warfare".

Blog.oxforddictionaries
If you’re ever looking to liven up a tea party with some fully-fledged warfare, then can I suggest that you try something subtler than putting salt in the sugar bowl or pushing someone down the stairs? Simply point to the curranty baked goods on the Cath Kidston three-tiered cake stand, and ask: “Scone or scone?”

I have a guess that this phrase is used in a jocular manner in this context. Why would somebody want to resort to warfare at a tea party? Does it mean figuratively "to provoke a big conversation"?
 
  • Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    Conflict can be friendly -- think of a friendly debate, or a friendly competition. Note that the writer puts this on the level of the conflict that might be caused by putting salt in the sugar bowl (you would ruin someone's tea and give them quite a surprise).
     
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