To make a bit

Er.S.M.M.Hanifa

Banned
Tamil
Hi everybody,
1. It would be easy to make a bit while I was travelling,
giving English lessons or working in hotels.
2. It would be easy to make a bit giving English lessons or working in hotels.
Are these two sentences grammatically correct?
If they are wrong, guide me to correct them.
Thanks,
Er.S.M.M.Hanifa
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Both of your sentences are fine, Er.S.M.M.Hanifa. "To make a bit" is a colloquial expression perhaps heard a little more in the UK than it is in the US. Nonetheless, I think that English speakers in all parts of the world would understand it.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    As an American speaker, I would probably like to know what you're making a bit of:

    1. It would be easy to make a little money while I was travelling, giving English lessons or working in hotels.
    2. It would be easy to make a little money giving English lessons or working in hotels.

    Or a little extra money or some money, or, less frequently, a bit of money. Looking over this vast range of choices, I would probably choose red. I think the idea is that you began travelling with money, so anything you made would be extra, and it would likely be little.
     

    Au101

    Senior Member
    England, English (UK)
    As a British English speaker, I, personally, immediately understood that to mean "make a bit of money". It is, as Owlman says, commonly heard and easily understood here in the UK, if not so much so over in the US.
     

    MJRupeJM

    Senior Member
    USA
    English- U.S.
    I agree with Copyright and Owlman that an AE speaker might want to know what you're making a bit of, but it's perfectly understandable. I haven't really heard the expression "make a bit" but I could understand it immediately in context.
     

    JimInUSA

    New Member
    English - USA
    As an American English speaker, I confirm, the sentences seem gramatically correct to me, but have a definite "British" sound due to the "make a bit" phrase.
     

    Er.S.M.M.Hanifa

    Banned
    Tamil
    Thanks for explaining to me the meaning of the phrase - "to make a bit".
    Could I rewrite the sentence as below.
    1. It would be easy to make a bit -by- giving English lessons or working in hotels.
    If I use the 'by' - preposition, would the sentence make sense or not?
    Thanks,
    Er.S.M.M.Hanifa
     

    Er.S.M.M.Hanifa

    Banned
    Tamil
    1. It would be easy to make a bit of money -by- working in hotels.
    2. It would be easy to make a bit of money working in hotels.
    I suppose 'by' - the preposition is hidden and understood here.
    Could you cite some more examples to show the omission of
    preposition 'by'.
    Thanks in advance,
    Er.S.M.M.Hanifa
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    1. It would be easy to make a bit of money -by- working in hotels.
    2. It would be easy to make a bit of money working in hotels.
    Just a comment about BE and AE. The "bit" bit sounds Brit to me... and as native BE speakers have mentioned, the "of money" is understood. So to me, I would either use "a bit" by itself if you want BE, or "a little money" if you want AE.

    I suppose 'by' - the preposition is hidden and understood here.
    Could you cite some more examples to show the omission of preposition 'by'.
    I'll leave that to someone else. It works either way -- with by or without by -- in your examples.
     
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