to make somebody (but not to do something)

< Previous | Next >

mO_ok

Senior Member
Lithuanian
Hello,

I'm wondering what's the meaning of the phrase in this sentence:
Despite the first officer’s best intentions, Thomas Frank must’ve made him.
It's taken from a thriller 'Crash and Burn' by Lisa Gardner. The situation described concerns cops that were tricked by this individual, Thomas Frank. I'm curious whether the phrase 'make him' could refer to 'fooling one' or rather 'recognize one in disguise'?
 
  • Rain_UK

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I found the chapter on here [from FreeBooksVampire].
    It is the chapter 26 of Crush & Burn.

    -------
    From the chapter
    'Despite the first officer’s best intentions, Thomas Frank must’ve made him. Rather than run for it, he’d knocked on the door of the room next to his. Introduced himself to Brad Kittle, who, it turned out, had spent most of the morning doping up. When a strange dude offered him the keys to his car, that had seemed the best thing that had ever happened to good old Brad. <-----Excess quote deleted by moderator. Please post no more than four sentences of quoted text.----->

    Read the parts in bold and think over them.
    As you can see, the first officer [that is, Wyatt] saying that Thomas Frank was under arrest, actually he was not Thomas Frank. That is because Thomas must have made him [must have mocked the first officer, definitely], because Thomas Frank knocked on the door of the room next to his, where Brad Kittle was in, stoned. Thomas Frank took advantage of Brad and gave him the keys of his car [suggesting him that he ought to go for a test drive, that is not true, definitely]. Brad Kittle did know that he was on drugs but did not care at all, since he considered it as exciting, even though he had got his driver licence suspended. He did know that it could be a problem. So, Wyatt and Kevin returned to the motel and the original reporting officer greeted them in the parking lot, very excited to hear how things had turned out, ironically, given that the two police officers had just got Thomas Frank's room number, crashing through the door and finding out what it was most likely to be found - an empty room and Thomas Frank nowhere in sight.

    Hence, must've made him here means that Thomas Frank must have mocked him [that is, Wyatt, though his best intentions in order to arrest him.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    mO_ok

    Senior Member
    Lithuanian
    Well, i try to be as brief and as informative as possible. So the cops are looking for this guy Thomas Frank and one patrol officer spots his car near a motel. The officer informs detectives about his discovery. The officer is told to keep low profile and do not approach Thomas. When the detectives arrive they get involved in a car chase supposedly going after Thomas car. However, it turns out that Thomas has given his car keys to some pothead who was behind the wheel. Also, he disappears from the hotel.
    And then you have this sentence that I find confusing.
    I'd really appreciate native speaker's opinion here.
     

    srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Rain_UK and london calling are native speakers.

    From the American Heritage Dictionary online: Slang: Identification of a person or thing, often from information in police records: Did you get a make on the thief?

    This definition is for "make" as a noun. Your quote is for "make" as a verb, which I did not find. I think the meaning for "made" in your quote is (by extension) "recognized" or "was able to identify." The first officer was recognized by Thomas Frank.

    Edit: Cross-posted with london calling. I didn't read the chapter.
     
    Last edited:

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Srk, you obviously know your slang far better than I do;), but when I read the word in context (see the link to he chapter that Rain kindly provided) that's not what I understand it to mean:oops:.
     

    srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    london calling said:
    that's not what I understand it to mean:oops:.
    When I said that I didn't read the chapter, I meant that you know better than I do.

    Now I've done some reading, and I still see it the same way: Thomas Frank recognizes the officer and, rather than run, goes next door and gives his car keys to Brad Kittle, who drives Frank's car, crashes it, tumbles out and is arrested.

    It doesn't help that the author uses "run for it" for both Thomas Frank and Brad Kittle.
     
    Last edited:

    Rain_UK

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Srk, you obviously know your slang far better than I do;), but when I read the word in context (see the link to he chapter that Rain kindly provided) that's not what I understand it to mean:oops:.
    I totally agree with you. I am not American so Srk did know the slang far better than we do, but I think that you, london calling, are right.
    Actually, what you have just stated, is the same I have written above in post #3.
     

    mO_ok

    Senior Member
    Lithuanian
    Thank you so much, especially for taking the trouble of providing as well as reading the chapter not to mention your efforts to dig up the definitions in specific dictionaries!
     

    srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    There has been some cross posting, and I've edited post #8 more than once. I know of no definition of "make" that by itself means "mock." I could read "make like" with that meaning. To bump up my latest interpretation, it is the same as my first: that "Thomas Frank must've made him" means "Thomas Frank must have recognized him as a police officer."
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top