to make something ready

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Baltic Sea

Banned
Polish
Hello all users!

I would like to ask you whether the sentences below are synonymous with one another and are acceptable to you.


  1. The tank was cleaned in order for the owner to inspect (it).
  2. The tank was cleaned in order that the owner should (might) inspect it.
  3. The tank was cleaned for the inspection by the owner.
  4. The tank was cleaned for the inspection on the part of the owner.
I am especially interested in the first sentence.

Thank you in advance.
 
  • MuttQuad

    Senior Member
    English - AmE
    Hello all users!

    I would like to ask you whether the sentences below are synonymous with one another and are acceptable to you.


    1. The tank was cleaned in order for the owner to inspect (it).
    2. The tank was cleaned in order that the owner should (might) inspect it.
    3. The tank was cleaned for the inspection by the owner.
    4. The tank was cleaned for the inspection on the part of the owner.
    I am especially interested in the first sentence.

    Thank you in advance.
    They are virtually synonymous, with only slight differences in nuance. The first sentence is fine. The second sentence is a bit awkward.

    The third sentence, I think, is best; it should read "for inspection" rather than "for the inspection."
     

    Baltic Sea

    Banned
    Polish
    Thank you for the response. Judging by your answer I can conclude that the structure "to make something ready in order for something else to happen" is feasible in the English grammar and acceptable to you. Am I right?
     
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