to make the most, or to make the most of?

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enkidu68

Senior Member
turkish
Hi folks, this is cited from Colonel Jack by Defoe.
What he adds is "the benefit of a...." to the pleasure of looking back..." This is Ok, if I am not mistaken
but finishing of this sentence is not clear to me. "should not it be this way: "qualifies us to make the most useful and just (fair?) remarks upon our own actions" Because he doesn't say make the most of.

Here I wrote these memoirs, having to add to the pleasure of looking back with due reflections the benefit of a violent fit of the gout, which, as it is allowed by most people, clears the head, restores the memory, and qualifies us to make the most, and just, and useful remarks upon our own actions.
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    The basis of the phrase is: "...qualifies us to make remarks upon our own actions".

    The phrase "the most, and just, and useful " is a set of adjectives which qualify "remarks". It has nothing to do with the idiom "make the most of".

    Modern usage would not put in two "and"s but otherwise it's OK.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Here I wrote these memoirs, [during which, to the pleasure of looking back with due reflections, I had also to add the benefit of a violent fit of the gout (this is said with irony), which (gout), as most people will agree, clears the head, restores the memory, and gives us the academic qualifications to make the most remarks/observations, and just (= wise and fair) remarks/observations, and useful observations about our own actions.
     
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