to merge/to couple/to combine

pepolas

Member
Italy, Italian
Hello!

I am writing a cover letter and I am stuck with this phrase

"My competitive advantage for this position is my ability to couple a strong experience in project management with a deep understanding of the complex links between security, good governance and socio-economic development".

Does it make sense? Or this second option is better?

"My competitive advantage for this position is my experience in project management, coupled with a deep understanding of the complex links between security, good governance and socio-economic development".

Any suggestion is welcome.

thanks!
 
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  • Spira

    Banned
    UK English
    What a great title to the thread!
    My ability to couple seems to refer to your sexual prowess.
    However, in context I think the first version just about works, although another verb such as "ally" might sound better. I definitely prefer your second example.
     

    Big Hoser

    Senior Member
    English-Français
    I am of the opposite opinion. I feel that if I wanted to use the first construction, I would change "couple" to "merge".
    "My competitive advantage for this position is my ability to merge a strong experience in project management with a deep understanding of the complex links between security, good governance and socio-economic development."

    I prefer the second sentence, and in my opinion, it requires no modifications.

    If you have an ability, it is to combine (hence merge) two skills and use both skill-sets in one seamless package (you). You could even use "combine" (or blend, or integrate, etc.), it might seem more natural to you.
    However, if you have an ability to "couple", basically my comprehension is that you're good at matching things together - things that should be together. The meaning of the word "couple" is accurate, don't get me wrong. I would just vote for another word. In the second sentence, you are not coupling anything, but rather one skill is coupled by another skill - and in that case, the sentence doesn't jar me as much.

    As indicated by Spira, when you say you have an ability to couple... it does have a certain "ex-porn-star" ring to it.
    Also worth noting: different locales might have very differing views on the word "couple" as a verb.
     
    Last edited:

    Spira

    Banned
    UK English
    I am of the opposite opinion. ???
    Then all you write tends to concord with my contribution. We both prefer the second sentence. As Pepolas indicates no opinion, just his question, what exactly do you mean by "opposite"?
    Is "merge" the opposite of "ally"?
     

    pepolas

    Member
    Italy, Italian
    I am of the opposite opinion. I feel that if I wanted to use the first construction, I would change "couple" to "merge".
    "My competitive advantage for this position is my ability to merge a strong experience in project management with a deep understanding of the complex links between security, good governance and socio-economic development."

    I prefer the second sentence, and in my opinion, it requires no modifications.

    If you have an ability, it is to combine (hence merge) two skills and use both skill-sets in one seamless package (you). You could even use "combine" (or blend, or integrate, etc.), it might seem more natural to you.
    However, if you have an ability to "couple", basically my comprehension is that you're good at matching things together - things that should be together. The meaning of the word "couple" is accurate, don't get me wrong. I would just vote for another word. In the second sentence, you are not coupling anything, but rather one skill is coupled by another skill - and in that case, the sentence doesn't jar me as much.

    As indicated by Spira, when you say you have an ability to couple... it does have a certain "ex-porn-star" ring to it.
    Also worth noting: different locales might have very differing views on the word "couple" as a verb.
    Thank you for your detailed explanation.

    I'll try to change the title of the thread, I didn't know that the expression "ability to couple" had a sexual connotation... At least I learned something new ;-)
     

    pepolas

    Member
    Italy, Italian
    I am of the opposite opinion. ???
    Then all you write tends to concord with my contribution. We both prefer the second sentence. As Pepolas indicates no opinion, just his question, what exactly do you mean by "opposite"?
    Is "merge" opposite to "ally"?

    I am a girl by the way... Thanks for your help.

    I will use the second example
     

    Big Hoser

    Senior Member
    English-Français
    Spira - my apologies - you're quite right. I stopped reading your post at "...I think the first version ..." and literally went no further.
    I just re-read. I pretty much took your post and just made it long-winded.

    Apologies all around, I'll be more thorough in the future.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    What a great title to the thread!
    My ability to couple seems to refer to your sexual prowess.
    However, in context I think the first version just about works, although another verb such as "ally" might sound better. I definitely prefer your second example.
    If there is a vote, then I totally agree with this post!
     
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