to-morrow

Ptak

Senior Member
Rußland
I'm sorry if the thread already exists... But I didn't find it.

Is the spelling to-morrow used nowadays? I've seen it in Thackeray's "Vanity Fair", and my dictionary gives two variants - tomorrow and to-morrow. Is the latter one old-fashioned or is it still used nowadays?
Thanks.
 
  • Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    According to the OED it was regularly written as two words until 1750. In its quotations "to-morrow" peters out right at the end of the 19th c. Of course, this is not a definitive guide, but it is an indication that this spelling became marginalized during the 20th century. It would not be a generally accepted spelling in the 21st; it's obsolete.
     

    Aerio

    Member
    USA
    English, Polish
    I'm sorry if the thread already exists... But I didn't find it.

    Is the spelling to-morrow used nowadays? I've seen it in Thackeray's "Vanity Fair", and my dictionary gives two variants - tomorrow and to-morrow. Is the latter one old-fashioned or is it still used nowadays?
    Thanks.

    I've seen it written in older texts like that.
    I would imagine (or hope at least) that everyone would understand what to-morrow means, even if they've never seen it like that before or don't use that spelling.
    It's rarely, if ever, used today.
    If you were writing the word, stick to tomorrow since some people might think you're misspelling the word (even if, as fact has it, you are not).
     
    Last edited:

    Ptak

    Senior Member
    Rußland
    I've seen it many times in ''The Idiot'' of Dostoevksy, too.
    But... Dostoevksy never wrote in English.
    ''The Idiot'' was written in Russian, even if it could seem strange.

    Well... First I came across this to-morrow in sir Pitt's note which contained many mistakes, and I thought it was a mistake, too...

    "Sir Pitt Crawley begs Miss Sharp and baggidge may be hear on Tuesday, as I leaf for Queen’s Crawley to-morrow morning erly."

    But afterwards I saw Thackeray used to-morrow everywhere. So it's old-fashioned... Thanks for your replies.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    I remember to-morrow in The Monk by Lewis (18 c.) and in Great Expectations by Dickens (19 c.). Joyce used tomorrow in The Portrait of an Artist as a Young Man (20 c.).

    As to on the morrow I think Lewis used it to in the Monk...
    ...a quick search shows it’s true:
    Ambrosio advised her against encouraging these sentiments, and then quitted her chamber, having promised to repeat his visit on the morrow.
    http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/etcbi...modeng/parsed&tag=public&part=3&division=div1
    However, Lewis, also used capital letters where they wouldn't be used in modern English.


    Tom
     
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