To move (trans.)

AmideLanval

Senior Member
How can one render in your languages the transitive verb "to move" as used in the following sentences?

1) Did you move my cup of coffee?
2) I’d like to move my appointment to Wednesday at 2 p.m.
3) I lifted weights yesterday and can barely move my arms.
4) I’ll move my car so you can back out.
 
  • Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    In French, I essentially think of two verbs: déplacer or bouger.
    1) As-tu déplacé/bougé ma tasse de café ? (déplacer is formal, bouger is colloquial, also: changer de place)
    2) Je souhaiterais déplacer mon rendez-vous à mercredi 14h (also in that case: reporter)
    3) J'ai soulevé des poids hier et je peux à peine bouger mes bras (bouger is the only possible verb in that case)
    4) Je vais déplacer/bouger ma voiture pour que tu puisses reculer (déplacer is formal, bouger is colloquial)
     
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    Greek:

    1) «Παίρνω» [ˈpe̞r.no̞] --> to take, get, receive which is the aphetism of the Classical v. «ἐπαίρω» ĕpaírō --> to lift, raise, lift up, set on, a compound: Prefix and preposition «ἐπί» ĕpí + verb «αἴρω» aírō.
    Did you move my cup of coffee? = Πήρες τον καφέ μου; [ˈpi.ɾe̞s̠.ˌt̠o̞ŋ.ɡa.ˈfe̞.mu↗] --> did you take my coffee?.

    2) «Αλλάζω» [a.ˈla.z̠o̞] --> to change, alter, modify, shift, switch < Classical v. «ἀλλάσσω» ăllắssō --> to make other than it is, change, alter, give in exchange, barter one thing for another.
    I’d like to move my appointment = Θα ήθελα ν'αλλάξω το ραντεβού μου [θa.ˈi.θe̞.la.na.ˈla.k͡s̠o̞.ˌt̠o̞.ɾaŋ.de̞.ˈvu.mu] --> I'd like to chanɡe my rendezvous.

    3) «Κουνάω/κουνώ» [ku.ˈna.o̞] (uncontracted)/[ku.ˈno̞] (contracted) and learned «κινώ» [ci.ˈno̞] --> to move < Classical v. «κῑνέω/κῑνῶ» kīnéō (uncontracted)/kīnô (contracted) --> to set in motion, move, set going, cause, call forth.
    I lifted weights yesterday and can barely move my arms = Σήκωσα βάρη χθες και δεν μπορώ να κουνήσω/κινήσω τα χέρια μου [ˈs̠i.ko̞.s̠a.ˈva.ɾi.xθe̞s̠.ce̞.ˌðeɱ.bo̞.ˈɾo̞.na.ku.ˈni.s̠o̞.ta.ˈçe.rʝa.mu] or [ˈs̠i.ko̞.s̠a.ˈva.ɾi.xθe̞s̠.ce̞.ˌðeɱ.bo̞.ˈɾo̞.na.ci.ˈni.s̠o̞.ta.ˈçe.rʝa.mu] --> I lifted weights yesterday and I can't move my arms.

    4) «Μετακινώ» [me̞.t̠a.ci.ˈno̞] --> to transfer, remove < Classical v. «μετακινέω/μετακινῶ» mĕtăkĭnéō (uncontracted)/mĕtăkĭnô (contracted) --> to shift, remove, transfer from one place to another, a compound: Prefix and preposition «μετά» mĕtắ + verb «κῑνέω/κῑνῶ» (see earlier).
    I’ll move my car = Θα μετακινήσω το αμάξι μου [θa.me̞.t̠a.ci.ˈni.s̠o̞.ˌt̠o̞.a.ˈma.k͡s̠i.mu] --> I'll remove/transfer my car.
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    How can one render in your languages the transitive verb "to move" as used in the following sentences?

    1) Did you move my cup of coffee?
    2) I’d like to move my appointment to Wednesday at 2 p.m.
    3) I lifted weights yesterday and can barely move my arms.
    4) I’ll move my car so you can back out.
    Catalan:

    (All of them are possible with moure 'to move', but 2 and 3 might use a different one)

    1) M'has mogut la tassa de cafè?
    2) Voldria moure / passar "to pass" / canviar "to change" la meva cita al dimecres a les dues.
    3) Ahir vaig estar aixecant pesos i gairebé no puc bellugar / moure els braços.
    4) Mouré el meu cotxe perquè puguis tirar enrere.

    Bellugar [bəʎu'ɣa], when transitive, is most often used with parts of your body.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Palestinian Arabic:

    1) Did you move my cup of coffee?
    زحت فنجان القهوة تبعي؟

    2) I’d like to move my appointment to Wednesday at 2 p.m.
    بدي أغيّر موعدي ليوم الأربعاء ع الساعة ٢:٠٠

    3) I lifted weights yesterday and can barely move my arms.
    مبارح رفعت أثقال ويادوب قادر أحرّك إيدي

    4) I’ll move my car so you can back out.
    خليني أزيح سيارتي عشان تطلع

    1) and 4) use a verb that means to shift the physical location of.
    2) is literally “change.” There may be a spatial metaphor that’s used, but I can’t think of one right now. “change” is what I would say here.
    3) uses a verb that means to successfully achieve movement.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    How can one render in your languages the transitive verb "to move" as used in the following sentences?

    1) Did you move my cup of coffee?
    2) I’d like to move my appointment to Wednesday at 2 p.m.
    3) I lifted weights yesterday and can barely move my arms.
    4) I’ll move my car so you can back out.
    1) Frankly, in Russian the verb here might greatly depend on the pragmatics (which you didn't specify), much like word order would anyway. The verb might be трогать (trógat' "touch"), подвинуть (podvínut' "to make a small move with sth", "to shift sth"), сдвинуть (sdvínut', here "to move/shift from its original place"), передвинуть (peredvínut' "to move from one place to another") and, finally, just двигать (dvígat' "to move sth"), the use of which here would mean approximately ~"did you ever happen to move my cup of coffee?"

    2) Я бы хотел перенести встречу/приём/... на среду на два часа. (Yá by khotél perenestí vstréchu/priyóm/... na srédu na dvá chasá.) - literally "I would want to carry the appointment to Wednesday to 2 o'clock", as in "to carry from one place to another".

    (The word for "appointment" depends on the nature of the appointment (typical business contexts are one thing, a visit to the doctor is another). You normally don't need to specify that it's not 2 a.m., but to be entirely precise and formally correct you may use "на 14:00" (na chetýrnadtsat' nól' nól') or "на два часа дня" (na dvá chasá dnyá, i.e. "to two o'clock of daytime").)

    3) Я вчера качался и едва могу двигать руками (Yá vcherá kachálsya i yedvá mogú dvígat' rukámi) - Lit. "I yesterday swinged and barely can move with.hands/arms".
    Or to reinforce: "...и едва могу двинуть рукой" (...i yedvá mogú dvínut' rukóy) - "...and barely can make-a-single-move with.hand/arm".

    (Качаться basically means "to make power exercises to improve one's strength and muscle mass", which would be the most idiomatic colloquial variant as long as you don't really need to specify that you *only* lifted weights, or to be more formal.)

    4) Actually the most idiomatic variant here would be "я отъеду, чтобы ты мог выехать" (yá otyédu, chtóby tý móg výyekhat'), i.e. ~"I will drive away so-that you could drive out", with the verbs отъехать (otyékhat') and выехать (výyekhat') both implying moving in a land vehicle (not necessarily driving it, in fact) or riding an animal - "away" and "out" respectively.

    But if we're adamant about using verbs more directly related to moving something, there's an option "я передвину машину, чтобы ты мог выехать" (yá peredvínu mashínu, chtóby tý móg výyekhat') - lit. I'll re-move (from.a place to a place) the car so.that you could drive out. There's also an option переставлю (perestávlyu, ~~"I will re-stand sth from one place to another"), but it implies that your car will then remain there, which is rarely the case under such circumstances.

    Don't forget that Russian verbs are extensively conjugated: the inflections and often the stem itself will change depending on the form you need to use (mood, tense, number, person/gender...).
     

    alfaalfa

    Senior Member
    italiano
    Ciao,
    in Italian:
    1) Did you move my cup of coffee? > Hai spostato la mia tazza/tazzina? (without "coffee" which is reduntant)
    2) I’d like to move my appointment to Wednesday at 2 p.m. > Vorrei spostare l'appuntamento a....
    3) I lifted weights yesterday and can barely move my arms. > Ieri ho fatto sollevamento pesi e oggi posso muovere appena le braccia
    4) I’ll move my car so you can back out. > Sposterò l'auto per farti fare manovra (farti fare retromarcia/farti uscire)
     
    Polish

    We have different options (verbs)

    przekładać [pʃɛˈkwadaʨ̑] = put to another place, move something from one place to another , reschedule etc.
    przesuwać [pʃɛˈsuvaʨ̑],(przesunąć) = move , shift.
    przenosić [pʃɛ̃ˈnɔɕiʨ̑] = move , carry, shift
    poruszać [pɔˈruʃaʨ̑] = move

    Did you move my cup of coffee? Czy przesunąłeś moją filiżankę kawy?
    I’d like to move my appointment to Wednesday at 2 p.m.Chciałbym przełożyć or przesunąć moje spotkanie na środę o 14:00.
    I lifted weights yesterday and can barely move my arms. Wczoraj podnosiłem ciężary i ledwo mogę poruszać rękami.
    I’ll move my car so you can back out. Przesunę mój samochód, żebyś mógł się wycofać.
     
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    Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    Finnish:
    1) siirtää, though it depends what exactly you mean by "move the cup". In some cases I'd rather say viedä (take (somewhere)).
    2) siirtää
    3) liikuttaa
    4) siirtää
     
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