To offer me a doctor as my judge,...

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ida2

Senior Member
Persian - Iran
Hello,

In the following context, could you please paraphrase the bold part?

In The Doctor’s Dilemma, George Bernard Shaw questioned whether people can be impartial when they have strong financial interests in a decision. He wrote, “Nobody supposes that doctors are less virtuous than judges; but a judge whose salary and reputation depended on whether the verdict was for plaintiff or defendant, prosecutor or prisoner, should be as little trusted as a general in the pay of the enemy. To offer me a doctor as my judge, and then weight his decision with a bribe of a large sum of money . . . is to go wildly beyond . . .[what] human nature will bear”.


Source: Resolving Ethical Dilemmas: A Guide for Clinicians by Bernard Lo
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    To put a doctor in control of my destiny, and then in turn control him by paying him lots of money to make whatever decision you told him to, would be to go against all normal standards of fair play.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    The Doctor's Dilemma was a stage play, written in 1906. As with many of George Bernard Shaw's stage plays, although it was written for public entertainment, he wanted to convey a serious message. In The Doctor's Dilemma, Shaw was being more serious than usual and he wrote a separate Preface on Doctors, which is from where your quote comes. The opening sentences of the Preface on Doctors provide an excellent example of what Shaw means in your quote:
    It is not the fault of our doctors that the medical service of the community, as at present provided for, is a murderous absurdity. That any sane nation, having observed that you could provide for the supply of bread by giving bakers a pecuniary interest in baking for you, should go on to give a surgeon a pecuniary interest in cutting off your leg, is enough to make one despair of political humanity. But that is precisely what we have done.​

    A surgeon, getting paid to cut off a patient's leg, will doubtless be tempted to say that the leg needs cutting off, for if the leg does not need cutting off, the surgeon does not get paid.
     
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