to pass over vs to skip vs to omit

Irelia20150604

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi everyone! Here are three sentences:

1) I will pass over the fact that my opponent is a liar.
2) The company passed over several qualified women and hired a man. (from pass - WordReference.com Dictionary of English)
3) Let's pass over the technical details and get straight to the parts that really interest you. (Pass - Definition for English-Language Learners from Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary)

If I replace "to pass over" with "to skip" or "to omit"...

1) I will skip/omit the fact that my opponent is a liar.
2) The company skip/omit several qualified women and hired a man.
3) Let's skip/omit the technical details and get straight to the parts that really interest you.

What difference will it make? I suppose they have the same meaning.
 
  • Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    1. This would be okay with skip but not so much with omit - we can skip, gloss over or pass over something while still mentioning it, but omit is logically inconsistent, since by mentioning the fact at all we have not omitted it. Some people might still choose to say this for stylistic reasons.
    2. No, this is a different usage of pass over, ("ignore"), and skip and omit don't work
    3. Yes both skip and omit work here.
     
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