to pick a prop up and take it on stage

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VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
A stage manager working on the show Mamma Mia!:
... a prop is just an everyday object that the actors use. In our show we use a lot of luggage, a diary, letters, a hairbrush. It can be anything, but the fact that the actor picks it up and takes it on stage makes it a prop.
British Council video

Explain please the meaning of the pink verbs.
Thank you.
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I think they have their normal meanings, Vik.

    If an actor picks something up and takes it on stage, then by definition that something is "a prop".

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    EDIT: just a thought - are you seeing "take [it] on" as a phrasal verb? It isn't:).
     
    Last edited:

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    I think they have their normal meanings, Vik.

    If an actor picks something up and takes it on stage, then by definition that something is "a prop".
    I.e.: "pick up" = "lift something",
    "take it on the stage" = "take something while you're on the stage"
    Is it right?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    "Pick up" = "lift something":tick:

    "Take it on stage" = "take it onto the stage" = "carry it onto the stage".

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    cross-posted with Florentia.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Ah, I see. Thank you, everybody.

    But is this a proper use of the preposition on being the same as onto?
    When I do something on the stage it means I'm on the stage and am doing it. Or does the verb 'take' itself add a special meaning here?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'm afraid we quite often use "on" to mean "onto".

    I put the book on the table = I put the book onto the table.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    I'm afraid we quite often use "on" to mean "onto".

    I put the book on the table = I put the book onto the table.
    Yes, when you put an item on a table, "on" usually means "onto".
    But imagine: B is standing on a stage, A is backstage and wants B to give him money. B says "come over here and take it", which A does. Can A then say "I took money (from B) on the stage."?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    ... But imagine: B is standing on a stage, A is backstage and wants B to give him money. B says "come over here and take it", which A does. Can A then say "I took money (from B) on the stage."?
    Yes, you can:).

    Is your point that "take X on the stage" is ambiguous? You're right, it is - it's only the context which will tell you whether it means "take while located on the stage" or "take onto the stage".

    The same is true with the set (no article) phrase "on stage". "Take x on stage" can mean "take X while on stage" or "take X when going on stage". One point to note, though is that "on stage" is a set phrase - we don't say :cross:"onto stage".
     
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