To pin somebody to the wall

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Nicodi2

Senior Member
Français
Hi there,

Could someone help me understand the following:
[...]

"If you ask people their education, they pin you to the wall cause education goes deep with people(...)"

Thanks!
 
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  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    First of all, the sentence you present is ungrammatical, perhaps to illustrate lack of education, e.g. usage of "cause."

    Back when I was in grade school, bigger kids would hold smaller kids up against a wall to intimidate them or get their attenction.

    I suspect the phrase you cite (but we don't know the source) is a figurative expression along those lines.
     
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    N.Sebastian

    New Member
    English
    It was cited, actually - but the link was "unauthorised" and removed. It was from a TED video lecture. (Surely that much information can be given?)

    It didn't make sense to me at first glance, and unfortunately it still doesn't. It could have be used to illustrate an over-sensitivity to the subject - you ask a question and they "pin you to the wall" (intimidate, essentially corner you) instead of answering or ignoring it.
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    First of all, the sentence you present is ungrammatical, perhaps to illustrate lack of education, e.g. usage of "cause."
    Not lack of education, many of us, me at least, leave out the be in because, both in informal speech and writing, because of local use/dialect and by choice.

    GF..

    'Cause thaas 'ow many of us speak.. Informally that is. :)
     
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